A Quick Chat about Peer Mentoring Groups (PMGs)

To all members, as we begin a new year of mentoring, the NORDP Mentoring Committee offers Peer Mentoring Groups (PMGs). The seven PMGs are formed based on the corresponding Research Development pillars and provide an ideal platform for NORDP members to network with and learn from each other. We invite you to join a PMG! PMG sign-up is currently open at Wisdom Share.

Recently Melissa Li, Program Manager, Joint Institute for Translational & Clinical Research, University of Michigan joined the Leadership & Management PMG as a co-lead. Melissa interviewed the other co-lead, Katie Shoaf, Associate Director, Grants Resources & Services, Appalachian State University, about her PMG experience.

Melissa: First of all, what is the scope of activities of the Leadership & Management PMG? 

Katie: We cover everything from managing up to growing an RD office, supporting career development, and navigating conflicts. Anything that the group wants to chat about is on the table. Naturally, we spent a lot of time last year debriefing about the impacts of COVID on our workplace interactions. 

Melissa: What prompted you to join the PMG? Could you share a couple of PMG highlights since you joined the group? 

Katie: I have been involved with PMGs since the beginning. I serve on the Mentoring committee and the MESHH (mentorship, expertise, support, helping hands) subgroup that developed some of the tools to support the PMGs as they got started. Mentoring is so important, and I love the atmosphere of a support group clustered around an area of passion for folks. The Leadership & Management PMG has been a great fit. I’m in a quasi-leadership role as an Associate Director, but am very interested in professional development around leadership, so it’s been great to learn from my peers in this group. I’ve developed some really amazing relationships with my PMG cohort. It’s a different vibe than other committee work and other mentoring relationships, and has allowed me to grow alongside people I greatly respect. 

Melissa: Your PMG experience sounds great. How has the experience impacted your professional work? 

Katie: As with most mentoring and NORDP-related things, I learn so much from my peers and it is all translatable into my daily work. I get ideas about how to work better with others and positively impact research culture on my campus. There are also a lot of aspirational things that we discuss in these groups that spark discussions in my own office about long-term goals for RD on our campus. 

Melissa: The PMGs are currently open for sign-up. Any words to those who are considering/debating to join? 

Katie: Do it! It has been so great to build relationships in these types of groups. We support each other, share ideas, discuss our fears and areas of growth. It is a great, low-stakes way to get involved, meet new people, and leverage your NORDP membership. 

Melissa: Thank you so much for sharing your PMG experience and encouraging notes, Katie.

An overview on PMGs is available here. PMG sign-up is currently open at Wisdom Share. See this blog for more information on signing up for PMGs this year.

Please join us for a PMG Orientation on October 21 at 2:30-3:30pm EST. The Zoom link is https://us02web.zoom.us/j/81529400705.

Save the Dates: Expand your network by participating in the NORDP Peer Mentoring Groups!

One mentor is almost never adequate for the mentee. [The PMG] helped us to focus on what we could address”- Jennifer Glass, NORDP Board member and Mentoring Committee member. 

The NORDP Mentoring Committee’s Peer Mentoring Groups* (PMG)  provide an ideal platform for NORDP colleagues to learn from each other. NORDP Mentoring Committee currently has 7 PMGs Peer Mentoring Groups, based on the pillars of Research Development. 

1.     Career & Professional Development: exploring how to become more efficient and effective in our roles

2.     Communication: promoting awareness of RD opportunities and publicizing research

3.     Enhancing Collaboration: building collaborations and interdisciplinary research programs

4.     Leadership & Management: leading in both official and unofficial capacities

5.     Mentorship: discussing and supporting mentoring best practices for mentors and mentees

6.     Proposal Development: supporting faculty grant seeking and increasing extramural funding

7.     Strategic Planning & Advancement: guiding policy and planning for enhanced research and scholarship

Learn more about PMGs here.

This year PMGs will use the Wisdom Share platform (https://nordpmentoring.mywisdomshare.com), which is the same platform that NORDP uses for its mentoring program.  Please mark your calendars for the following dates:

October 1, 2021 PMG sign-up opens in Wisdom Share: You can begin to sign up for one (or all 7!) of the PMGs. Signup will be open October 1. 

To sign up for a PMG:

  1. If you’ve not yet registered in Wisdom Share, sign up with a login and password here
  2. Under “Role,” choose “Peer Mentoring.”
  3. On your dashboard’s far right side, you will see the PMGs; simply click join for the group(s) of interest.

Already-registered users can go directly to their dashboards.

October 21, 2021 – 2:30-3:30pm EST PMG Orientation  – Come join your PMG colleagues to learn about the process, Wisdom Share functionality, and meet as a group. The Orientation will include an introduction to the seven PMGs, engaging in PMGs on Wisdom Share, and an opportunity to get acquainted with the PMGs real-time. Click here to join the orientation: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/81529400705

* Participation in Peer Mentoring Groups (PMGs)  is one of the many benefits of being a member of NORDP.

Mentor Dyad Reflections: Jessica Brassard/David Widmer

We hope you are enjoying the opening months of the 2021-2022 NORDP Mentoring Program and that you have had a chance to meet in your dyad! We are excited to share a piece of Mentoring Reflection by introducing Mentor David Widmer, Manager of Research Development and Outreach at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, and Mentee Jessica Brassard, who recently transitioned from Michigan Technological University to a Graphic Designer position in the University of Michigan’s Research Development Office. Jess and David were paired for the 2020-2021 mentoring year and are continuing their engagement beyond the official program.

Short bios

David Widmer, PhD, is the Grants & Contracts Manager of Research Development & Outreach at Memorial Sloan Kettering (MSK) and has 20 years of research administration and research development experience.  David manages the G&C Funding Development Team (FDT) now in its 12th year of providing proposal development and funding acquisition support to MSK researchers. David’s outreach and training has focused on developing specific populations of investigators including junior faculty and post-doctoral researchers. David was part of the first NORDP mentoring class in 2011, has served on the Mentoring Committee since 2015, and served as MC co-chair from 2017-2021. This was his fifth year as a mentor. David is a Fulbright Scholar, a recipient of a Swiss Confederation fellowship, and has an MS in Cell & Developmental Biology, an MA in Humanities and Social Thought with a concentration in the History of Medicine, and a PhD in Behavioral & Molecular Neuroscience. 

Jessica Brassard is the Graphic Designer in the University of Michigan’s OVPR Research Development office. Jessica has a long background in fine art, design, and marketing and transitioned to research development in 2015 when she joined the Michigan Technological University RD team. She has experience with what we might think of as “core” RD responsibilities (faculty development, proposal development, strategic initiatives, workshops and training) but she has always loved the chance to work on visuals for proposals and science communication. She creates visuals that increase clarity and saliency for proposals and OVPR initiatives. This will be the fourth year that Jessica has participated in the NORDP Mentoring Program. She has been both a mentee, a mentor, and participated in a PMG or two. This year, she joined the Mentoring Committee and is focusing on the McMc (Mentoring Committee Marketing (sub)Committee). In all aspects of her life, Jessica strives to find ways to improve the world around her. 

  1. What influenced you to apply to be a mentor and a mentee for the 2020-21 NORDP Mentoring Program?
  1. JB — I believe I can learn something from everyone I meet. The NORDP Mentoring Program does a great job of creating opportunities to meet, build relationships, and learn from each other. 
  2. DW — My experience with the NORDP mentoring program previously has been very positive. I was in the first mentoring class in 2011 and my mentor helped me during a pivotal transition in my career of moving from Research Administration to Research Development. When I came to the Mentoring Committee in 2015, I started up again first as a mentee and then transitioned as both mentor and mentee. This upcoming year will be my fifth year as a mentor. My experiences with all my mentors drive me to want to pay it forward and the learning that happens with my mentee makes me want to mentor again. And by learning, I mean I learn from my mentees because I do every time. The mentoring experience shows that we all have something to share and that you might be in a better position to serve as a mentor now than you may think.
  3. What was your favorite part about your relationship?
  1. JB — As I have gotten to know David, I have enjoyed learning about his background. David has generously shared his published work which I have read and found fascinating. I enjoy spending time reflecting on the challenges he has faced over the past year in his institution and the issues I face in my institution. Having David’s perspective helps me reflect more clearly because he sees things from an outside point-of-view while still having the context of our RD mission. 
  2. DW — The camaraderie! Jess and I really clicked and talked about so much more than RD. I feel we have crafted an important connection that will last beyond the mentoring year. I even benefited from her baking skills and received a care packet for the Holidays.
  3. What surprised you about being a mentor or a mentee?
  1. JB — During the process of using the NORPD mentoring packet to reflect on my own progress, goals, and network, I am surprised by the progress I’ve made year to year. And again at the end of a mentoring year, I am surprised by the incredible benefit of the conversations we’ve had, despite shifting work priorities and adjusted meetings over the year. 
  2. DW — What’s surprised me from the start of mentoring was the reciprocal learning that happens. I taught enrichment to seventh and eighth graders in graduate school and staying one step ahead of them in topics and subjects was a challenge since they gave me perspectives I never had before. Mentoring kids I think put me in good stead to be a NORDP mentor although previous mentoring experience is not by any means a prerequisite for supporting your RD colleagues in mentoring.
  3. How has participation in the Mentoring Program helped broaden your horizons about Research Development in general and/or affected your daily work in particular?
  1. JB — In this year of the COVID-19 pandemic, I have struggled with the amount of work I can maintain in our new way of living and working. The Mentoring Program has helped “right-size” my expectations to the realities. While this is being done at my institution and within my unit, it is also extremely helpful to get perspective with both David and my other mentee. 
  2. DW — Bringing back to one’s home institution is an important benefit of NORDP membership and the Mentoring Program has helped me learn and grow in RD, and have colleagues to share and brainstorm ideas with to take back to MSK. The dyads and the Peer Mentoring Groups are great for that but they wouldn’t be such a success if it weren’t for the fabulous open and sharing NORDP membership.
  3. Any words of wisdom or encouragement for those wanting to apply next year? Any other thoughts you would like to share? 
  1. JB — Don’t get caught up in the tasks you might add to your list of to-dos or the additional meetings you need to schedule. Think of this as a year-long opportunity to get to know another human and add to your network!
  2. DW — If you think you are not ready to mentor, think again. Everyone has something to share, differing experiences to discuss, and perspectives that will broaden the horizons of another program. I thank Jess for broadening my horizons in our mentoring partnership this year.

Celebrating Mentoring Days Recap

This year’s Mentoring Program kicked off with an exciting two-day Celebrating Mentoring Days in June with more than 100 registrants! The event featured an inspirational presentation from our keynote speaker Dr. Kelly Diggs-Andrews on the science behind effective mentoring, and a special panel discussion on mentoring across differences – we would like to express a sincere ‘thank you’ to our guest panelists, Angela Clear, A.L. Carter, and Sarah Messbauer for sharing their experiences, perspectives and insight.

The event also brought a closure to the 2020-21 mentor-mentee cohort on a positive note through McHuddles for mentors and mentees, and it also launched the orientation activities for the 2021-22 Mentoring Program. A record-breaking 107 mentor-mentee pairs are participating in this year’s program. 

Other program highlights included demonstration of the newly adopted Wisdom Share software (many thanks to the NORDP Board of Director for their support!), a quick reboot of the On-board Packet tools, and a refresher on the Peer Mentoring Groups focusing on an array of research development topics, from Career & Professional Development, Leadership & Management to Proposal Development and more. 

It takes a village to organize and run the Celebrating Mentoring Days! We want to give a big shout-out to the MC organizers and the more than 30 MC member volunteers who made this year’s inaugural event a huge success! 

Having fun is better shared with others even in zoom!

Hats Off to 2021 NORDP Mentor Training Workshop Graduates!

The NORDP Mentoring Committee’s Mentor Training Team held a mentor training workshop in May-June 2021. Twelve NORDP members from 10 states participated in the 5-week workshop, covering the 9-module Entering Mentoring curriculum initially developed for research mentors and tailored by the NORDP Mentoring Committee for RD professionals. Developed in collaboration with the University of Wisconsin Center for Improvement of Mentored Experiences in Research (CIMER), RD professionals explored key mentoring competencies that can benefit RD mentors and mentees that have been associated with improved career outcomes, employee engagement and retention, and more inclusive work environments. The workshop was facilitated by NORDP members Jan Abramson, Toni Blair, Kristin Boman, Paula Carney, Tabitha Finch, Rachel Goff-Albritton, Kathy Partlow, Erica Severan-Webb, and Samarpita Sengupta. All participants and facilitators are invited to participate in other Mentoring Committee activities. The next Mentor Training Workshop is being planned and will be announced soon. If you would like to be contacted when the next workshop series is scheduled, please complete this form.

Kate AlfieriBrooke Gowl
Colleen BivonaWendi Jensen
Emily DevereuxMelissa Li
Susan ElkinsSarah Robertson
Christina ErlienJaime Rubin
Becky FousheeMelissa Vaught

Mentoring Reflections: Carolynn Julien & Hollie Fuhrmann


Welcome to the third installment of Mentoring Reflections! This time, we chatted with Carolynn Julien at Hunter College, CUNY who served as mentor to Hollie Fuhrmann at the University of Utah. 

If you have not yet, don’t forget to register to participate in Celebrating Mentoring Days on June 29th and 30th. The two-day program will be packed with enlightening mentoring focused sessions, roundtables and networking events. 

  • What influenced you to apply to be a mentor and a mentee for the 2020-21 NORDP Mentoring Program? 

In 2013, Carolynn received a mentor from the NORDP Mentoring Program. Her relationship with her mentor is still ongoing and has become a very important relationship in her life. Due to the importance of this relationship, she decided to #PayItForward, as the Mentoring Committee likes to call it, and be a mentor. For some time, Hollie has wanted to engage in a formal one-on-one mentorship relationship with someone that was not also her director/supervisor. She really wanted to develop a relationship and expand her network. The NORDP Mentoring Program provided that opportunity for them both.

  • What was your favorite part about your relationship 

Carolynn has found the mentoring relationship to be extremely fruitful. The biweekly meetings with Hollie have been the highlight of her week! Although she and Hollie have different backgrounds and experiences, they have connected in a special and unique manner. Hollie really didn’t know what to expect going into this experience. It is important to note that they started to meet and build their relationship at the same time that world was shutting down due to the pandemic and as issues related to racism, discrimination, and violence were becoming something we could no longer ignore. Their mentoring relationship became a unique moment to examine and discuss these important issues because how can we successfully serve and advance the research missions of our institutes without acknowledging and addressing equity, diversity, and inclusion. They are both thankful for the opportunity to discuss and guide each other on this journey.

  • What surprised you about being a mentor or a mentee? 

Carolynn was surprised at how satisfying and enriching their relationship has become and didn’t expect the mentoring relationship to develop into such a personal relationship. Their mentoring relationship has developed so organically and been so responsive to their lived experiences during challenging times. It has also been very personal. Hollie didn’t expect to connect with Carolynn on such a deep and personal level, especially over Zoom. In the beginning, Hollie saw their meetings as a work-related task. Now, she really looks forward to them and sees them as a break from work or as an opportunity to share and reflect on work and life more broadly.

  • How has participation in the Mentoring Program helped broaden your horizons about Research Development in general and/or affected your daily work in particular?

In the last several months, Hollie and Carolynn have discussed several work-related matters and their mentoring relationship has been an invaluable resource. In addition, their shared experience and their unbiased, trusted advice has helped them navigate being RD professionals and allowed them an opportunity to celebrate themselves as women leaders.

  • Any words of wisdom or encouragement for those wanting to apply next year? Any other thoughts you would like to share?

Just do it! And, be open to the experience! You will be surprised by the connections and the progress you will make as individuals and as a team.

If you would like to share your mentoring story, please contact mentorprogram@nordp.org.

Inaugural Innovation Award Goes to NORDP Mentoring Committee

NORDP recently presented its Inaugural 2021 NORDP Innovation Award to the NORDP Mentoring Committee at the organization’s 2021 annual conference.

Faye Farmer, member of the NORDP Board of Directors, notes that this award was created to recognize individuals, groups, or organizations that leverage unique approaches to kickstart innovation in research development. She describes the NORDP Mentoring Committee as, “setting the highest bar for true innovation in our organization.” For this reason, the committee was selected for this initial award among an extremely competitive pool of candidates.

“We especially recognize the work they’ve accomplished this past year to revolutionize how our organization operationalizes mentoring,” Farmer says.

NORDP’s Mentoring Committee members have leveraged their individual skills and expertise in new and inventive ways, she adds. They established the first-ever metric-based mentor matching system, adapted mentoring materials to the unique field of research development, implemented themed peer mentoring groups, and created new programming to connect research development curious individuals not in the profession to established professionals as a pipeline for member recruitment and retention.

“This committee of innovators is advancing the research development field in ways that generate evidence of promise or demonstrable results, a requirement of this inaugural award,” Farmer says.

“NORDP is so fortunate to have such innovative members who are actively advancing research development,” Farmer says.

If you, your committee, or your institution is interested in preparing a nomination to this or other awards, check out NORDP.org for additional information. The timeline for NORDP Awards, from nomination through recognition, is as follows:

  • Call for nominations issued: Second Wednesday in September
  • Nomination period: September to November
  • Awards Q&A webinar: Final Wednesday in September
  • Nomination deadline: First Wednesday in November
  • Awardee recognition: During the annual Research Development Conference

NORDP fosters a culture of inclusive excellence by actively promoting and supporting diversity, inclusion and equity in all its forms to expand our worldview, enrich our work, and elevate our profession.

Celebrating Mentoring Days Keynote on Digging Deeper and Doing Better

The NORDP Mentoring Committee presents Celebrating Mentoring Days Tuesday, June 29 and Wednesday, June 30. Come celebrate mentoring! 

All NORDP members are invited to attend. The complete program and registration information is available at https://nordp.memberclicks.net/celebrating-mentoring-days

Dr. Kelly Diggs-Andrews, Diggs-Andrews Consulting LLC, will deliver the opening keynote on “Digging Deeper, Doing Better: The Science of Effective and Inclusive Mentoring in STEMM” at 11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. EDT on Tuesday, June 29. 

The content of this keynote is applicable to Research Development (RD) professionals, as we mentor both formally and informally across a variety of disciplines. In her keynote, Dr. Diggs-Andrews will provide an intellectual framework to accelerate the acquisition of mentoring insights to cultivate effective mentoring relationships.

Mentoring is a critical aspect of academic training and research progress, yet is often learned and perfected only through trial and error. Participants will learn about evidence-based approaches to broaden participation of culturally diverse groups in the science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and medical (STEMM) fields. Overall, RD professionals will gain confidence in working with mentees from diverse backgrounds, add new strategies to their mentoring toolbox, and gain access to available resources to support quality mentorship in their professional careers and at their home institutions. Participants will be able to continue the discussion in breakout group discussions immediately following the keynote on 1) Digging Deeper – the science behind effective mentorship, or 2) Doing Better – mentoring across diverse dimensions.

Kelly Diggs-Andrews, PhD is the founder and CEO of Diggs-Andrews Consulting, LLC, a consulting and media company whose goal is to broaden accessibility to science careers through science outreach, diversity training, and professional development. She is also a senior Master Facilitator with the National Research Mentoring Network (NRMN) and the Center for the Improvement of Mentored Experiences in Research (CIMER), where she leads both in-person and virtual workshops for research mentors across career stages and disciplines nationwide. She has led trainings at national scientific conferences for the American Society for Microbiology, International Mentoring Association, the Society for Neuroscience, the Annual Biomedical Research Conference for Minority Students, and others as well as numerous colleges, universities, and medical institutes. Her curricular expertise includes Entering Mentoring, Facilitator Training for Entering Mentoring, and Culturally Aware Mentoring.

#PayItForward by Mentoring

– When you learn, teach. When you get, give. – Maya Angelou

Applications for the 2021-2022 NORDP Mentoring Program are now open and will be accepted through June 7, 2021!

Are you ready to take your learning up a notch? Mentoring is an excellent way to:

  • Learn by teaching
  • Build your professional network
  • Create and continue a culture of mentoring within NORDP
  • Share knowledge and exchange ideas 
  • #PayItForward

The Mentoring Program is an opportunity to enhance your skills by interacting with other Research Development professionals. Every year, there is a high need for mentors – and YOU have wisdom to share! Consider becoming a mentor (and, you can be a mentee as well). If you are not sure if you are ready to mentor, watch this lightning talk: The Transition from Mentee to Mentor.

To make it easy, the Mentoring Committee has developed OnBoarding and Reflection Packets with resources for mentors and mentees to support all phases of the mentoring relationship (see the Mentoring Toolkit). The Committee continues to develop and hone these resources to meet the needs of both mentors and mentees. In addition, each mentor-mentee pair is assigned a facilitator who is available to answer any questions. The Committee also offers Mentor Training that helps you build upon competencies crucial for mentoring relationships. The May/June series has already started, but you can share your scheduling preferences to help us plan for future Mentor Training workshops if you are interested.

Questions? Let us know! mentorprogram@nordp-adminrdp.org

Interested in learning more? See what previous matched pairs say about their experiences:

Mentoring Reflections: Carolynn Julien & Faye Farmer

Mentoring Reflections: Jamie Burns & Eric Wayne Dickey

Finally, SAVE THE DATE on June 29 and 30 (11 a.m. – 7 p.m. EDT) for Celebrating Mentoring Days hosted by the Mentoring Committee! A full program and registration information will be coming soon.

Mentoring Reflections: Jamie Burns & Eric Wayne Dickey

Welcome to the second installment of Mentoring Reflections! This time, we chatted with Eric Wayne Dickey who is at Western Oregon University and served as mentor to Jamie Burns at Arizona State University. 

A reminder that the NORDP Mentoring Program is open for applications; consider applying!

  • What influenced you to apply to be a mentor and a mentee for the 2020-21 NORDP Mentoring Program?

Eric: My previous institution had a job performance coaching program where I learned the value of mentoring as a mentee. I was then encouraged to become a mentor. I was a little reluctant at first but decided to ignore my own self-doubt. And I have never looked back. 

When I changed institutions, I was suddenly without a mentoring program, so I joined the NORDP Mentoring Program and now serve on the Mentoring Committee Leadership Team. 

Meeting with mentees inspires me. It takes a commitment to the self and a bravery to reach out for guidance. Mentoring reminds me to continue to develop my own professional self. I often joke with my mentees that by the end of our mentoring compact, it is they who will be mentoring and inspiring me. And so far, that has been true with every person I have mentored.

Jamie: Throughout my life and career, I have been very fortunate to have had incredible mentors. In realizing how these individuals have shaped my life, I was very intrigued when I learned of the NORDP mentoring program. I joined the program because I wanted to find a mentor within RD. I thought mentorship would help me gain better insight into the field and guide me on ways I can contribute to RD both inside and outside of my institution.

  • What was your favorite part about your relationship?

Eric: My current mentee inspires me. She is driven. She is successful. Being with people like this is my favorite part of mentoring.

Another favorite part is the trust and confidence mentees have in me. It is a sacred agreement. It takes a leap of faith for mentees to reach out. Providing a safe space and confidential guidance are why I am there.

Jamie: I was very thankful for the openness of my mentor to listen and share. I wasn’t sure what to expect when the program began; but, I found that I not only gained a mentor, but an ally who listened to what I was thinking, helped me consider multiple perspectives and possibilities, and ultimately encouraged and supported the decisions I made. 

  • What surprised you about being a mentor or a mentee?

Eric: I have mentored more than a dozen people. I thought I was alone out there in this crazy world. Alone with my self-doubt, with my imposter syndrome, and with my crazy notion to be a nice person that helps people. What surprised me most is learning how much need there is out there for positive role models and interactions. Some previous mentees have had some real challenges in their work environments, with their tasks and with their colleagues. Mentoring helps normalize things. We all face similar struggles. Helping people resolve their work-related issues is very rewarding.

Jamie: After hearing about the mentor/mentee program, I assumed the program would provide a strict structure to define the engagement. I was surprised that there wasn’t a set structure. Beyond the initial interactions with the NORDP member who coordinated and paired us, it was up to my mentor and me to determine what worked best for us. This flexibility was great as it allowed us to customize our interactions so that my mentor could help me achieve specific goals.

  • How has participation in the Mentoring Program helped broaden your horizons about Research Development in general and/or affected your daily work in particular?

Eric: Mentoring colleagues has been a great way to help me better mentor the faculty I serve. It’s helped me improve my conversational and deep listening skills. Mentoring has helped me improve my own work environments and to better advocate for myself. It is a win-win-win, for the mentee, for the mentor, and for their institutions.

Jamie: It was a huge benefit to have mentorship from an RD professional at a different institution because my mentor could offer different perspectives about RD. By combining the best practices my mentor shared with me with the best practices I’ve learned from my mentors at ASU, I gained a broader understanding of RD. 

  • Any words of wisdom or encouragement for those wanting to apply next year? Any other thoughts you would like to share? 

Eric: Don’t wait to become your best self. Start now.

Jamie: If you’re thinking about mentoring, I would recommend the NORDP Mentor Training program. My mentor encouraged me to attend this training, and it was a great experience! The program helped me develop the confidence to mentor in the future.

If you would like to share your mentoring story, please contact mentorprogram@nordp.org.

Applications for the 2021-2022 NORDP Mentoring Program are now open and will be accepted through June 7, 2021.