Nominations for 2022 NORDP Awards due Dec. 1

NORDP offers a number of member-nominated awards to shine a spotlight on the outstanding accomplishments of individuals making exemplary contributions to the organization as well as the profession and/or field of research development.

Each year, NORDP members are invited to submit nominations for the Innovation Award, Leadership Award, Rising Star Award, and NORDP Fellow designation. These awards honor NORDP member’s commitment to excellence and impact and recognize the contributions member-leaders make to the research development community. 

Consider nominating someone you know who is moving the needle on:

  • strategic research advancement;
  • communication of research and research opportunities;
  • enhancing research collaboration, team science, or research leadership capacity; or
  • proposal development. 

The deadline for submitting nominations for NORDP Awards to be given in 2022 is 8:00 p.m. EDT/5:00 p.m. PDT on Wednesday, December 1, 2021. Nominations must be submitted via InfoReady.

An informational webinar about the NORDP Awards process featuring an overview of award types and the nomination preparation and review processes will be held on Friday, October 29, at 2:00 p.m. EDT/11:00 a.m. PDT.

Registration is required and may be completed here. For more information about member recognitions, visit the NORDP Awards website.

NORDP fosters a culture of inclusive excellence by actively promoting and supporting diversity, inclusion and equity in all its forms to expand our worldview, enrich our work, and elevate our profession.

NORDP 2021 Holly Falk-Krzesinski Service Award – Etta Ward

Named for NORDP’s founding President, this award is voted on by the Board of Directors and given annually to a NORDP Member in recognition of outstanding service to the organization, to the research development profession or field, and to peers.

Who: Etta Ward, Assistant Vice Chancellor for Research Development

Where: Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis

Number of years in research development: 19 +

Length of NORDP membership: 6 years

What initiative are you the most proud of in your role as a NORDP volunteer? 

There are several, but my work with the Mentoring Committee has been a highlight of my volunteer experience with NORDP. I enjoyed working with Jan Abramson and others to help develop and adapt resources for the Mentoring Program that would allow participants to be much more intentional about their experiences as a mentor or mentee. I was happy to partner with the Mentoring Expertise, Support and Helping Hands (MESHH) subcommittee to develop a custom kit adapted from proven research-based materials. I also loved working on this part of the program, understanding that it provides the resources needed to be successful.

Another pivotal aspect of my work with the Mentoring Committee was an effort with Jan, through funding from the NORDP Strategic Alliances Committee, to attend the National Research Mentoring Network Level One Entering Mentoring Facilitator training, which allowed us to train others. As a result, members of the Mentoring Committee built a relationship with NRMN and the Center for the Improvement of Mentored Experiences in Research (CIMER) that allowed us to modify modules for RD professionals to deliver competency-based mentor training, and now our content is an official part of their training curricula.  

I was also part of a team led by Kathryn Partlow from the Mentoring Committee to present at the University of New Mexico Mentoring Institute conference in 2019. This annual conference brings together a broad constituency of researchers, educators, community leaders and other professional partners who support the power of mentoring. 

At the UNM Mentoring Institute, strategic connections were made, and knowledge garnered to support NORDP’s endeavors around effective mentorship. As a result of participating in the Mentoring Institute, NORDP was published in the Journal of Coaching and Mentoring, and those in attendance discovered there was such a thing as mentoring software to support mentoring programs. By early 2021, the board had invested in mentoring software to support the membership.

Members of the NORDP Mentoring Committee will be presenting and participating in the 2021 UNM Mentoring Institute.

How has your service to NORDP enhanced your career?

NORDP has truly been catalytic in my career trajectory in RD. My first job in higher education was as a faculty development professional, which is what I considered my focus. I did not consider myself in RD at the time. Members of my staff actually got to know NORDP first. Alicia Gahimer, program and operations manager at IUPUI, went to a number of conferences and told me I had to go. I took her advice and ended up finding my people, as many of us say!  

I went to conferences and learned to be intentional in my involvement. I talked with my Vice Chancellor about NORDP being the premier RD professional organization and over time he wanted me to come up with a title and job description that represented what I was doing. I used NORDP’s salary survey to find a match for my role to accurately describe my current position as Assistant Vice Chancellor for Research Development. 

How did you hear about NORDP and what made you join initially?

Colleagues in my office had heard about NORDP through our regional contacts. I supported staff members who wanted to attend conferences where they could find a match/fit for the type of engagement they had with faculty. Many of us became involved with NORDP committees. It really got my attention when they were coming back with great new ideas and amplifying our existing efforts. Alicia encouraged me to join as well and when I did, I found people both similar and different than me which only added to what I was able to learn from them. 

What relationships have you built as a result of NORDP?

When I joined the board, I began by asking a lot of questions so that I could learn more about the board and the individuals who were on it. Over time I developed strong relationships with these folks who are also leaders at their home universities. It is an honor and a privilege to work with people leading a national organization with international influence. I love that I can continue to build intentional relationships with people in strategic positions where I can create and drive the direction of the RD profession. 

Describe how NORDP has changed from when you initially joined

When I first joined, I had the sense of a tension about access to certain groups, but I now understand that some of it was a perceived tension. I do acknowledge that there were members who found it hard to connect with others. NORDP’s leadership recognized this and has since been willing to go deep to understand the concerns of members, especially in the area of inclusion. Members expressed concerns in the membership survey and the board responded. They were willing to get to the point of discomfort and stay there if necessary to advance diversity, equity and inclusion efforts, something that will be a priority for the organization moving forward. NORDP’s leadership pays attention to areas where the organization needs to improve. 

What recommendations do you have for members to get more involved with NORDP?

When you join NORDP you will find your people, but don’t stop there. Get to know someone you don’t work with or know deeply. These relationships open up a world of possibility personally and professionally. You can reach out through the listserv, committee work, and conferences. Make it a point to connect with people you don’t know as well as those who work in different parts of RD.  

If you need help in getting involved don’t hesitate to contact a board member. We are always happy to help you. Finally, I would say get the most out of your membership. Don’t be a bystander and sit on the sidelines.   

Compiled by Daniel Campbell, Member Services Committee

NORDP 2021 Leadership Award – Gretchen Kiser

The Leadership Award award honors a member, a group of members or a team, a research development unit, or an organization that demonstrates exceptional leadership and/or a deep commitment to volunteerism in ways that advance the profession or field of research development.

Who: Gretchen Kiser, Executive Director – Research Development Office

Where: University of California San Francisco

Number of years in research development: 20

Length of NORDP membership: 11 years

What initiative are you the most proud of in your role as a NORDP volunteer? 

I would say that NORDP’s efforts to integrate diversity as an organizational mandate is something I am proud to have initiated. When I became NORDP President, Rachel Dresbeck told me that you only have a year in the role and you need to choose something specific to champion. I felt that NORDP had to do more to encourage inclusion and support diversity in an active way, both in our ranks and the organization itself.  

In addition to modifying the NORDP committee structure into the form that exists today, we also set in motion a diversity working group that has now turned into the Committee on Inclusive Excellence (CIE). We worked and are still working hard to infuse these values into all that NORDP does.  

I believe that diverse voices make teams and organizations stronger. It is important to me that we reflect that value in NORDP. Working in RD, we serve in key roles on our campuses where we can serve as instigators of change, acting as change agents for this kind of inclusive excellence mindset. 

How has your service to NORDP enhanced your career?

I always leaned in heavy when opportunities presented themselves during my time with NORDP. My service has enabled me to have experience in leadership roles that I would not have in my day job. My involvement on the board especially has provided invaluable experiences quite relevant to my career progression.

NORDP has also afforded me the visibility as a professional person of value. Many folks in RD are not always lifted up with awards and recognition at their home institutions as this is sometimes limited for professional staff in the academic area. I have been a conference chair, developed leadership programs, served as a leader on a non-profit board, presented conference posters, workshops, and panel presentations, developed important relationships with national and international leaders through my NORDP roles, and grown my strategic planning skills through NORDP organizational projects like developing the CIE and NORD. 

Additionally, my engagement with NORDP has provided me with a huge cadre of colleagues to bounce ideas off and share both successes and failures. Some of my closest friends are colleagues from NORDP and some of my most valuable colleagues are my friends from NORDP. 

How did you hear about NORDP and what made you join initially?

A research administration colleague at an institution where I worked previously had heard about a small group called NORDP. I was Director of Special Projects reporting to a VPR at the time and what I did sounded like RD to her. I immediately checked it out and realized it was my group of people. It brought together a myriad of things for me; the ability to adapt and extrapolate experiences, strong organizational skills, the ability to communicate across research disciplines, the judgement to recognize the critical elements at hand, and a passion for research.

What relationships have you built as a result of NORDP?

I have made many lifelong friends and colleagues over the years. I now have a huge support network both professionally and personally for career and my job. Whenever I begin a new project, I can always find someone who has been involved with something like it or who is willing to brainstorm on it. NORDP is an exceptional resource, and it offers a rare joy in the way I can call someone up about virtually anything. The tone of NORDP has always been one of holding each other up instead of competing with each other. The comradery and mutual respect have been uplifting and strengthening throughout my decade plus membership. 

Describe how NORDP has changed from when you initially joined

Our commitment to diversity across the organization has been a big change. A structure of mentoring has become a large part of NORDP as well. It was not always codified, but the Mentoring Committee has made significant advances in offering mentoring of all types to our membership. Another change is that things are much more structured than at the beginning e.g., our system of committees and their key goals. Overall, the culture of sharing and volunteerism is still the same and we are always trying to expand and provide more resources to our members.

What recommendations do you have for members to get more involved with NORDP?

Getting involved gives you so many opportunities for growth in things like data analysis, strategic planning, facilitation, etc. It also gives you a chance for professional visibility that RD folks don’t always get elsewhere. NORDP is a living resource that provides countless chances for networking, people you can call on for advice/questions, past conference presentations, program examples, and so on.  

The options are limitless, and you can take your engagement in any direction with NORDP. Throughout my time I have been involved as a presenter at numerous conferences, in exploring RD Continuing Education, as chair or member for several Committees, Conference Chair, Vice President, and President, as well as numerous other areas. To be fair, volunteering for NORDP does take a time commitment. But, it affords you so many avenues to grow and do good: you won’t regret it!

Compiled by Daniel Campbell, Member Services Committee

Rising Star Award Cameo – Rachel Goff-Albritton

Who: Rachel Goff-Albritton, Assistant Director – Office of Research Development

Where: Florida State University

Number of years in research development: 4 1/2

Length of NORDP membership: 4 1/2

What initiative are you the most proud of in your role as a NORDP volunteer? 

I am really proud of my role in mentor training for RD professionals over the past two years. Over my time as part of the mentor training subcommittee of the Mentoring Committee I have helped to create training materials and worked with three cohorts of NORDP members to provide training sessions using evidence-based practices. We have helped teach them effective mentoring strategies using an interactive discussion-based training in collaboration with national centers and organizations (CIMER and NRMN) who are tasked with cultivating effective mentoring in the U.S. 

How has your service to NORDP enhanced your career?

My involvement with NORDP has helped me find best practices for my office by learning from other offices across the country as well as other committee members. They have given me ideas for educational workshops and other events for faculty. I am also putting the mentoring strategies learned from my volunteer work into use in my role as assistant director and while supervising students. I have also learned how to be a peer mentor, and I am learning as much from my peers as they learn from me. The Mentoring Committee is a fun one to be on and one where everyone is truly trying to give back, which is what I enjoy the most about it. 

How did you hear about NORDP and what made you join initially?

My boss, Beth Hodges, who is also my mentor, is great about providing staff members with professional development opportunities. She believes that it is important to be involved in your national organization to make sure you are providing services and resources that are cutting edge and relevant. I was able to attend the conference during my first year and I have always left the conferences feeling pumped to do my job with lots of new ideas. I really love this about NORDP!

What relationships have you built as a result of NORDP?

I have made a lot of friends across the country through my engagement with the Mentoring Committee. I have had mentors and mentees who have now become colleagues, such as Jenn Glass, Deborah Lundin, and Tanya Volkert. I have learned from their experiences and brought them back to FSU. I have really enjoyed working with Jan Abramson, Kathy Partlow, and Paula Carney, as well as with the rest of the mentor training subcommittee! I am constantly gaining little chunks of knowledge from them on how they approach their roles as RD Professionals. 

Describe how NORDP has changed from when you initially joined

The Mentoring Committee has really improved the resources provided for the mentor/mentee pairs. They truly help build relationships and now offer different mentoring options like peer mentor groups, which provide mentoring for any type of experience you are looking for. I also served on the Nominating Committee where I have seen many improvements on the nominating process for board and officer positions, and the mentoring committee’s Facilitators Subcommittee, where volunteers have improved the roadmap for mentor/mentee relationships and the facilitator check-in process throughout the annual program.

What recommendations do you have for members to get more involved with NORDP?

Join the Mentoring Committee as we have a lot of fun! Volunteer with any committee and you will meet people who will provide you with opportunities for growth and professional development. There are mentors on every committee who offer many learning opportunities. You can also present at conferences. Every time I present I meet someone new who does what I do and we become collaborators. You are helping NORDP as a volunteer, but you also gain a great deal as well.

Compiled by Daniel Campbell, Member Services Committee

NORDP Fellow Cameo: Karen Eck

Who: Karen Eck, Assistant Vice President

Where: Office of Research, Old Dominion University

Number of years in research development: 16

Length of NORDP membership: 11

What initiative are you the most proud of in your role as a NORDP volunteer? 

I am very excited about NORDP’s membership in INORMS (International Network of Research Management Societies) that began in July 2020. We had been involved unofficially in the past when Peggy Sundermeyer represented NORDP at the 2018 international INORMS Congress in Edinburgh. Prior to membership, Rachel Dresbeck participated on the INORMS committee that put together the 2019 RAAAP Survey of research managers. After I completed my term as NORDP President I became a co-chair of the Strategic Alliances Committee and worked with Peggy to apply for membership and build a case for joining. It is a great leap forward for NORDP to be on the international stage and collaborate with others around the world involved in research management.

I also represent NORDP in my role on the INORMS Council. I am proud that we put in the effort to be on the world stage. Over the past year we have seen the importance of international collaboration to solve big problems in response to the COVID pandemic. The international relationships we foster through INORMS will provide professional opportunities for individual members as well as the organization itself. 

How has your service to NORDP enhanced your career?

It has enabled me to meet so many different people in many roles around the world. I have been able to learn about the issues facing them at their institutions. It has also helped me to bring back new ideas to ODU in every realm of our work, from interactions with faculty to communication to how we position ourselves as an office.

NORDP has widened my network that now includes friends and colleagues from around the world who I can call on for questions or advice. Getting involved with your professional organization is a win-win for you and NORDP. 

How did you hear about NORDP and what made you join initially?

My introduction to NORDP came through the listserv. I joined ODU in October 2009 as Director of Research Development. I had always worked as part of a team, but the leadership role was a new one for me. I was also coming from Canada, so it was a new institution as well as a new funding landscape. When I found out about an organization that was focused exactly on what my job was, I knew that I had found my tribe and I had to join.

I heard about the Chicago conference in 2010 and when I went, I saw that most people had roles like mine, and it really allowed me to learn more about my new role. I was relieved to find others doing exactly what I was trying to do at ODU. The RD role is often unique on-campus and NORDP helped me figure out how to find the right collaborators back at my home institution. 

I am still working with many of the people I met when I first joined. It has been rewarding to maintain these relationships for over a decade and it has been exciting to watch NORDP grow as well. 

What relationships have you built as a result of NORDP?

I have been part of the Mentoring programs for the past seven years, and it has been rewarding to maintain those relationships long after the official mentoring period has concluded. My four years on the NORDP Board and in leadership roles including conference organizing helped me develop some great friendships that I cherish to this day. There are many wonderful and dedicated people in NORDP!

When I worked in Canada, I was a member of CARA (Canadian Association of Research Administrators) and I now serve as NORDP’s liaison to CARA. It is wonderful to interact with leadership in both organizations. I hope to capitalize on this role to help educate and build RD connections in Canada where it is growing in scope. 

I am also excited about my engagement with INORMS where I have been meeting people from around the globe and been able to talk with them about research management issues. 

NORDP is a group of people who wants to learn and collaborate with our peers. While this may seem counterintuitive, since we are all competing for funding, by helping each other it helps the research enterprise as a whole.

Describe how NORDP has changed from when you initially joined.

I think one of the biggest changes is the number of members. We have increased our membership by tenfold with over 1,000 currently. Our first official conference was 120 and our most recent was over 700.  

It is amazing to see how far we have come and how much we have grown as a volunteer driven organization. NORDP has always been run by volunteers and the commitment shown by everyone involved from committee members and chairs to board members over the years is remarkable.  

Another big change has been the engagement of professional staff in recent years. They have been a great asset helping manage conference-related activities and helping NORDP expand its capabilities and respond to what members are looking for from their professional organization. 

It has really been amazing to watch the Mentoring program evolve into such a sophisticated operation. There are many opportunities to serve as either a mentor or mentee. The efforts in the areas of inclusive excellence and programs like the NORD research grants are also exciting elements. 

What recommendations do you have for members to get more involved with NORDP?

Be an active participant on the listserv by keeping up with it and contributing where you can. Take advantage of the tools offered on the website. 

Attend the conference if possible. It is a great experience and will be an asset for your job. Every year there are programs that will help you do your job better. It is a great opportunity to learn from others who are focused on the same issues from around the world. 

Figure out what you are passionate about in your professional development. There are so many areas to get involved with, ranging from broadening participation and inclusivity in the RD profession to research on best practices and mentoring. Joining a committee is a great way to connect with NORDP as well. 

Compiled by Daniel Campbell, Member Services Committee

Rising Star Award Cameo – Katie Shoaf

Who: Katie Shoaf, Associate Director

Where: Grants Resources & Services, Appalachian State University

Number of years in research development: 5

Length of NORDP membership: 5

What initiative are you the most proud of in your role as a NORDP volunteer? 

I really enjoyed my role working in the core group with Kari Whittenberger-Keith and Paige Belisle to kick off the pilot RD 101 program.  I found developing and refining the curriculum to be the most rewarding aspect.  We are currently working with an instructional designer for the next version of the program.  RD 101 is a great opportunity for NORDP to put our best foot forward.

I am also proud of my participation in the LEAD initiative and the LEAD peer mentoring group in particular.  Our Fireside Chats were well received this past spring and we have more in the works for the coming year.  

These two working groups gave me unique avenues to participate, cultivated professional opportunities and gave me a chance to make meaningful contributions right away in my volunteer role. 

How has your service to NORDP enhanced your career?

I have been fortunate to work with Fletch, who is super involved with NORDP, throughout my RD career.  We are a team of three and she encouraged me to get involved with NORDP from the start.  I saw the impact it had on her and I knew it would benefit me as well. 

My engagement with NORDP has broadened my network across the country with hundreds now a part of it and I no longer feel as if I am in a tiny RD bubble.  I have built meaningful relationships through committee work, mentoring, and other activities.  Many of those connections were already virtual prior to the pandemic and that helped ease the transition to working from home.  

How did you hear about NORDP and what made you join initially?

Fletch arrived at Appalachian State shortly after I did and she encouraged me to join.  She was very involved in committee work and I knew right away that I wanted to be a part of it as well.  I attended my first conference in Arlington/DC.  I truly feel like I am contributing to the profession and that my committee work actually matters. 

What relationships have you built as a result of NORDP?

I have met so many people through NORDP while only working at a single institution.  I had never talked to anyone else involved with RD or RA before.  I met Jan Abramson through the Mentoring Committee. She intentionally reached out to me outside of regular meetings and encouraged me to run with ideas that I had.  This extra encouragement gave me professional confidence in both my NORDP and work roles. 

Kari Whittenberger-Keith invited me to be a part of the RD 101 initiative which was huge for my own professional development.  Jill Jividen asked me to be a co-chair for the 2021 conference as well.  These efforts showed me that my peers had faith that I would be a positive contributor despite only having tangential interactions in some cases.  This was valuable to me personally and I am forever grateful for their little nudges that opened great opportunities for me.  I am also thankful to Fletch for the initial push to join!

Describe how NORDP has changed from when you initially joined

I am not sure if I have enough perspective for this as I have only been involved since 2017.  I did know that NORDP were my people when I went to my first conference.  We have all had the challenge of explaining to our family what it is that we do in RD, but when I came to NORDP it was like, “Oh yeah this is the thing.”  It has given me a real sense of community. 

I have a better understanding of NORDP’s inner workings which has changed my relationship with it now that I know it better.  I know that my efforts are valued and how I can best contribute.  

NORDP is growing and has a lot of avenues to develop your leadership skills.  We provide professional development for members at all stages of their careers.  We are looking at equity and inclusion issues and doing well to respond to changing times.  We are increasing meaningful engagement of members through programs like RD 101 and LEAD. 

What recommendations do you have for members to get more involved with NORDP?

Regardless of your experience or personality there is something for you to give to NORDP.  You can join a committee or sub-committee, join a mentoring diad or group, submit an abstract for conference consideration.   I would encourage to reach out to someone you know or to me about how you can get involved.  

NORDP will welcome your contributions and ideas with open arms.  I have only been in RD for five years and I have seen tangible benefits during my time.  Introvert or extrovert, you can make a difference and have an impact on many people through your volunteer efforts. 

Compiled by Daniel Campbell, Member Services Committee

NORDP Fellows Award Cameo – Jacob Levin

Who: Jacob Levin

Where: Founder & CEO, LGG Research Funding & Strategy Services

Number of years in research development: 20+

Length of NORDP membership: 12 years

What initiative are you the most proud of in your role as a NORDP volunteer? 

I would say that NORDP as a whole is what I am most proud of. I was part of the initial founding group and honestly we struggled in the early years. I sometimes wondered if we would survive during our first four or five years. It has been amazing to see NORDP’s growth from a plucky little startup to a reputable, full-scale professional organization, through the efforts of its dedicated, diverse, and collegial members. We have many great programs, but I think we still have not hit our full stride. 

Of all the things we do, I feel that the listserv is still NORDP’s most valuable asset. It has continually provided a wealth of valuable information to broad spectrum of members, and is a great example of the open and supportive communication that is a hallmark of our group. I have been involved with a number of other professional organizations throughout the research enterprise and no other community is as collegial and supportive. 

How has your service to NORDP enhanced your career?

It has been enormously impactful. NORDP is intrinsically entangled with my career. My service and engagement with NORDP has benefitted me professionally in countless ways, and motivated me to engage in activities take risks professionally that I probably wouldn’t have otherwise. I’ve worked on well over 1,000 grants, with 2,000 plus faculty, and dozens of universities, but I consider NORDP my most impactful professional accomplishment, and the one of which I am most proud. I literally cannot imagine what career I would have had without NORDP. It has driven much of what I have done and vice versa. 

How did you hear about NORDP and what made you join initially?

Back in early 2009 I received a phone call from Holly Falk-Krzesinski out of the blue. She was truly the driving force in getting us all together. There were a number of people doing RD seemingly alone at universities across the country. It was a new idea that everyone had simultaneously. Holly had looked through directories of major universities for RD related job titles and began reaching out to people. When she first called me we talked for over an hour. Soon the listserv began, we had our first meeting, and we undertook the process of incorporating as a 501(c)3. I actually came up with the name for NORDP back then. Holly had suggested calling it the National Research Development Professional Association, but nerds as we all may be, I wasn’t sure that NRDPA would be a draw. Sorry Holly!

What relationships have you built as a result of NORDP?

My closest professional friendships are people that I have met through NORDP. I am still in touch with colleagues who have moved on from my office, and those I have worked with for years at universities across the country. RD is really my field now, despite my original training as a physicist and biologist. Research development is a network of networks that has opened up many opportunities for me. There are numerous things that I would not have done without my involvement in NORDP. Nothing else has been quite like it in terms of opening doors and developing professional relationships & lasting friendships. 

Describe how NORDP has changed from when you initially joined.

At the start we were very grassroots with everything done basically by hand. Back then the Vice President was responsible for putting on the annual meeting which I did for the second one which had 200 people. It was like putting on your own wedding (and it was actually in the same place I was married!). I had my family and work colleagues bringing in food, setting up signs, making badges, and working registration, while I was directing and introducing people, managing invited speakers, interacting with the hotel staff, and presenting in 5 sessions! The entire conference I was running around in chaos. It was like that for a few years, but it was what was needed at the time. 

Now we are truly a professional organization. Our most recent conference made me proud. Successful conferences do not come easily and are not a given, especially when they have to be done virtually. NORDP 2021 was the best online conference I have attended.

I think we are still only halfway there, however. We have become an effective entity and are now serving as sponsors at other group’s conferences, like the recent INORMS 2021. Research development is now considered a basic function at many universities. Vendors now see us a one of their primary customer bases.We have earned a level of professionalism and respect in the research enterprise and we are known throughout it. 

What recommendations do you have for members to get more involved with NORDP?

Just do it. Just start. Whatever it is that interests you, or you have experience with. You couldn’t find a more welcoming community. Everyone is so collegial, and they know what you are going through. NORDP pays you back in ways that you do not expect.

RD is a field that lends itself to volunteerism. We are all used to working on teams and on things that are not quite done yet. RD work like NORDP engagement is always in progress. 

NORDP is accepting of people and their interests. If you have an idea that is helpful to you, chances are it will be helpful to others. Get involved in any way you can. I promise you will not regret it!

Compiled by Daniel Campbell, Member Services Committee

References:

  1. Levin, J. 2011. The Emergence of the Research-Development Professional. Chronicle of Higher Education, March 27, 2011. http://chronicle.com/article/The-Emergence-of-the/126906/
  2. Rainey, R.F. 2013. Jacob Levin brings in the research money. AAAS Member Spotlight, Feb 1, 2013. https://www.aaas.org/jacob-levin-brings-research-money
  3. Currie, E. 2011. Off the Path – Jacob Levin, UCSF Synapse, 25 May 2011. https://synapse.library.ucsf.edu/?a=d&d=ucsf20110525-01.2.10&e=——-en–20–1–txt——txIN–

2021 NORDP Awards • Due November 4

NORDP has created three new awards to celebrate the outstanding accomplishments of members making exemplary contributions to the organization, the profession, and/or the field. These awards honor the excellence and impact of NORDP members and recognize contributions of NORDP member-leaders, including the practice or production of new knowledge related to activities such as (but not limited to):

  • strategic research advancement,
  • communication of research and research opportunities,
  • enhancement of research collaboration and team science, and
  • proposal development.

NORDP Awards will celebrate the distinctive achievements of individuals, collaborative groups or work teams, programs or projects, and organizations. Winners of NORDP Awards will be recognized during the annual NORDP Research Development Conference.

Nominations for NORDP Awards, including self-nominations, may be submitted by any NORDP member in good standing. Unless otherwise indicated, current members of NORDP’s Board of Directors are ineligible to submit nominations (including self-nominations). Information about prior NORDP Award recipients is available here.

All nominations for NORDP Awards (including the existing Rising Star Award) will be accepted through a new InfoReady NORDP awards portal and nominations will be due the first Wednesday in November, annually. 

See more about award types below, and submit nominations by November 4, 2020.

Questions? Join us October 14, 3:30-4:15 pm EDT for a discussion about new NORDP award opportunities:

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/87332077727 | Meeting ID: 873 3207 7727

Award Types

Innovation Award

Recognizes individuals, groups, or team; functional units; or organizations who leverage unique skills or resources to kick-start innovation in research development and advance the profession or the field in ways that generate evidence of promise or demonstrable results. Innovations leverage partnerships, experiment with tools and techniques, or generate and share knowledge to advance NORDP and the work of its members.

Eligibility: Regular NORDP members (i.e., non-board members) in good standing are eligible for individual nomination. NORDP members in good standing and current members of NORDP’s Board of Directors may be included as part of nominations for groups, teams, functional units, or organizations.

Leadership Award

This award honors a member, a group of members or a team, a research development unit, or an organization that demonstrates exceptional leadership and/or a deep commitment to volunteerism in ways that advance the profession or field of research development.

Eligibility: Regular NORDP members (i.e., non-board members) in good standing are eligible for individual nomination. NORDP members in good standing and current members of NORDP’s Board of Directors may be included as part of nominations for groups, teams, functional units, or organizations.

NORDP Fellow

Designation as a NORDP Fellows is made to recognize the long-term accomplishments of members who have made sustained contributions to NORDP and worked tirelessly to advance research development as a profession and/or as a field. Status as a NORDP Fellow is the highest professional distinction the organization may bestow on a member. No more than one percent of NORDP members will be named Fellows annually. 

Eligibility: Regular members (i.e., non-board members) in good standing who have maintained an active NORDP membership for at least five consecutive years are eligible for nomination.

Rising Star Award

The Rising Star Award is bestowed on up to three members annually in recognition of outstanding, early volunteer contributions to NORDP and strong potential for future contributions to the organization and the profession or the field. Rising Star recipients receive waived registration for a subsequent NORDP annual conference. 

Eligibility: Regular members (i.e., non-board members) in good standing who have maintained an active NORDP membership for fewer than five consecutive years are eligible for nomination. Current and past board members are ineligible for this award.

NORDP fosters a culture of inclusive excellence by actively promoting and supporting diversity, inclusion and equity in all its forms to expand our worldview, enrich our work, and elevate our profession.

Introducing the Charter Class of NORDP Fellows

The Board of Directors of the National Organization of Research Development Professionals (NORDP) is pleased to name 13 long-time members to the charter class of NORDP Fellows.

As announced during NORDP’s recent Year in Review meeting, the Board is introducing several new ways to recognize individuals whose work is advancing the organization’s mission. Included among these new forms of recognition is designation as a NORDP Fellow.

Selection as a NORDP Fellow is an honorific distinction that recognizes the accomplishments of members who have made sustained contributions to NORDP and worked tirelessly to advance research development as a profession and/or as a field.

NORDP Fellow status is considered the highest professional honor our organization may bestow on a member. The charter NORDP Fellows are:

  • Jan Abramson, University of Utah
  • Jeff Agnoli, Ohio State University
  • Susan Carter, Santa Fe Institute
  • Kathy Cataneo, University of New Hampshire
  • Holly Falk-Krzesinski, Elsevier
  • Gretchen Kiser, University of California, San Francisco
  • Alicia Knoedler, Exaptive
  • David Stone, Oakland University
  • Peggy Sundermeyer, Trinity University
  • Kay Tindle, Texas Tech University
  • Barbara Endemaño Walker, University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Kari Whittenberger-Keith, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
  • Anne Windham, Brown University

The Board chose to seat an inaugural class of 13 NORDP Fellows to honor NORDP’s founder Holly Falk-Krzesinski plus each of the 12 years the organization has hosted an annual conference. Nominations for the charter class of NORDP Fellows were solicited among and considered by the Board of Directors.

Charter Fellows were selected based on distinctive and sustained contributions to NORDP, ranging from organizational development and growth to fostering a culture of diversity and inclusive excellence to peer network development and mentoring.

In the future, members will have the opportunity to nominate colleagues for NORDP Fellow status, new awards for innovation and leadership in research development, and the long-standing Rising Star Award.

A call for nominations for all NORDP awards to be made in 2021 will be issued before the end of September 2020.

The charter class of NORDP Fellows and the recipients of NORDP’s 2021 awards will be formally recognized in conjunction with the 2021 NORDP Annual Research Development Conference. Information about prior recipients of NORDP awards is available here.

NORDP fosters a culture of inclusive excellence by actively promoting and supporting diversity, inclusion and equity in all its forms to expand our worldview, enrich our work, and elevate our profession.

Rising Star Award Cameo: Vanity Campbell

Who: Vanity Campbell, Coordinator for Proposal Development Services, Office of Contracts and Grants
Where: University of California Agriculture & Natural Resources
Number of years in research development: 6
Length of NORDP membership: 6

What recommendations do you have for members to get more involved with NORDP?

One of the things that I love about NORDP is that there are so many incredible ways to serve. I would recommend getting involved with committee service as well as engagement with your region. You can look for ways to initiate regional activities by working through the Member Services Committee (MSC) and Regional Representatives IMG_9376on the MSC. Participating in the Mentoring Program is another excellent way to get involved. It offers the chance to connect with individuals as part of group or one-on-one and can lead to working on committees across NORDP.

How has your service to NORDP enhanced your career?

Prior to my current position I did not have much experience with RD event planning. I worked on the Committee on Inclusive Excellence for the NORDP conference in 2019. I helped recruit Jacqueline Cranford as the diversity keynote, worked to secure the speaking agreement, coordinated logistics, and offered guidance on what we were looking for in a message/presentation. I had never been exposed to this type of work before and this effort was a great benefit to me professionally. I was able to turn that experience into a Grant Essentials Summit this year where I was involved in overall messaging and securing California state agencies to participate as guest speakers.

I also built on that experience during my work on the Pacific Region’s first meeting. In collaboration with an amazing planning committee, I was involved with developing the agenda, and promoting the event which wound up exceeding our expectations.

How did you hear about NORDP and what made you join initially?

My first job in RD was at the University of California, Merced where I transitioned from a job in clinical research. My boss at the time, Susan Carter, made NORDP a part of the on boarding process for new staff members. Joining the organization really helped when I was starting my career in RD and it was wonderful to have NORDP at that point.

What relationships have you built as a result of NORDP?

My primary involvement has been with the Member Services Committee and it has been an incredible opportunity to work with those leading these initiatives. I have truly enjoyed working along with the other committee members to carry out work. It has been nice to see how the core and sub committees have worked together. I have also been involved with MSI initiatives throughout my time on the MSC. Serving as regional representative for the Pacific region allowed me to connect with folks across the region through welcome emails, conference communications and events. These efforts have helped strengthen my connection throughout the UC system that existed in my prior positions as well.

I have also been involved with the Mentoring Program where I established a strong one on one connection with my mentor, Kathy Partlow, and I also served as mentor for a number of other members.

Compiled by Daniel Campbell, Member Services Committee

NORDP fosters a culture of inclusive excellence by actively promoting and supporting diversity, inclusion and equity in all its forms to expand our worldview, enrich our work, and elevate our profession.