Mentoring Philosophy: A Mentor’s True North

Contributed by Melissa Li, Mentoring Committee

Mentoring is a dynamic, multidimensional, and complex relationship. How do seasoned and new mentors and mentees navigate these relationships? A mentoring philosophy could act as a compass to help relationships find their true north. So, what is mentoring philosophy?  A mentoring philosophy is a statement of a mentor’s guiding principles and approach in the mentoring relationship. Mentoring philosophies evolve with people and relationships. A mentoring philosophy can help mentors steer varied mentoring relationships and guide their mentoring practice. 

To understand the creation and evolution of mentoring philosophies, the NORDP Mentoring Committee had the privilege of inviting two colleagues who are seasoned mentors to share their mentoring philosophies and how they have been evolving along their mentoring journeys. Rebekah Hersch, Interim Associate Vice President for Research and Innovation at George Mason University, and Etta Ward, Assistant Vice Chancellor for Research Development, Indiana University–Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI) have 20+ years of mentoring experience each. Rebekah and Etta have mentored diverse groups of mentees, including students, staff, faculty, postdocs, and alumni. Both are active mentors in the NORDP Mentoring Program.

At the early stage of Rebekah’s mentoring journey, she was more mission-oriented, dedicating help to solve her mentees’ problems, so that the mentees could achieve their goals. Two decades later, Rebekah now focuses more on fostering mentees’ independence by being an effective listener and empowering the mentees to find solutions themselves. Rebekah also believes in #PayingItForward. She attributes her success to many excellent mentors, from whom she has learned valuable strategies and tools that she has been applying when mentoring others. Rebekah also recognizes the importance of showing empathy to mentees and constantly seeking mentees’ feedback. What has remained a constant beacon in Rebekah’s mentoring philosophy is that she is committed to helping mentees achieve their goals for their professional development.

Etta started IUPUI’s first-ever Preparing Future Faculty (PFF) program in the early 2000s. While she did not formally develop a mentoring philosophy at that time, she was deeply driven by this type of work as her professional calling and purpose. Over the years and through the National Research Mentoring Network (NRMN) Entering Mentoring Facilitator training, she developed a simple but critical guiding philosophy: the mentee drives the relationship, the relationship must be reciprocal, and both the mentee and mentor must continue to #PayItForward. She refers to this philosophy at the beginning of every mentoring relationship in the many presentations she gives on the topic. Etta also realizes the critical importance of competency-based, culturally aware mentoring practices. She is intentional in her approach to integrate aspects of diversity, equity, inclusion, access, belonging, and justice (DEIABJ) throughout her mentoring efforts and to achieve a mutually beneficial experience.

As the NORDP community celebrates the National Mentoring Month, Etta and Rebekah are sharing their wise words with all of us: 

  • Do not be afraid to be a mentor or think that you are not ready. Everyone has something they bring to mentoring relationships. Mentors do not need to know all as they can help mentees by identifying experts who can help.
  • It is beneficial that mentees develop a network of multiple mentors. 
  • Mentors and mentees are encouraged to learn how to notice, name and nurture the various types of mentoring and other developmental relationships (coaching, sponsorship, etc.).
  • Take advantage of NORDP’s resources.

To celebrate National Mentoring Month, the NORDP Mentoring Committee is hosting an Open House, a meeting dedicated to celebrate current Committee members, take stock of our accomplishments, and welcome NORDP members who are willing to get involved. Mark your calendars for Thursday, January 27th at 1pm CST for the Mentoring Committee Open House. Email mentorprogram@nordp.org for the Zoom link. All NORDP members are invited to attend!

NORDP fosters a culture of inclusive excellence by actively promoting and supporting diversity, inclusion and equity in all its forms to expand our worldview, enrich our work, and elevate our profession.

January is National Mentoring Month

The Mentoring Committee invites every NORDP member to celebrate National Mentoring Month from January 1-31. Originally developed as a campaign to expand quality mentoring opportunities for youth, the month-designation can be a catalyst to remember the mentors and mentees who have supported you along your path.

Watch social media and engage in conversation on mentoring (using #NORDPMentoringMatters and #MentoringMonth), take time to listen to a podcast or two (The Science of Mentorship from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine is a great listen), or explore the NORDP Wisdom Share Learning Library (register here if you don’t have an account in Wisdom Share). Here are some dates to make note of:

  • January 6: I am a Mentor Day – own it!
  • January 17: International Mentoring Day – #MentoringAmplifies support around the world
  • January 27: Thank Your Mentor Day –  share your story to inspire

Also explore some offerings from the National Research Mentoring Network (NRMN).

The National Research Mentoring Network (NRMN) is an NIH grant-funded initiative whose entire purpose is to diversify the STEM workforce by providing researchers across all career stages in the biomedical, behavioral, clinical, and social sciences field with evidence-based mentorship and professional development programming that emphasizes the benefits and challenges of diversity, inclusivity, and culture. Their program achieves that through mentorship, networking, and professional development through their online networking platform, MyNRMN, which has over 21,000 mentors and mentees.

NRMN Twitter Chat – Jan. 12 from 11am-12pm CST Follow the hashtag #NRMNchat

How to Leverage the NRMN Network Webinar Series (Monthly Series) – Jan. 17 at 11am CST. Register here: https://unthsc.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_z3ZWYl8TRSyyHPosIoIc9w

Mentoring Month Webinar: The Importance of Mentorship Throughout Your Professional Journey w/ J. Marcela Hernandez – Jan. 27 at 11am CST. Register here: https://unthsc.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_4laIf1V2Q8uFsm2N20F99g 

The NORDP Mentoring Program is a benefit available to all NORDP Members. The Mentoring Committee strives to provide resources and support for all NORDP Members interested in mentorship. To do this, the committee leverages national partnership and engages in a variety of scholarly activities. Members supporting members as mentors, mentees, or as part of a peer mentoring or learning group, making NORDP and the profession of research development a stronger community!

Applications will open in the spring for the 1:1 Mentoring Program. Peer Mentoring Groups are available to join any time, and we invite you to start 2022 by joining  and exploring opportunities within the Mentoring Committee. For more information, email the Mentoring Committee and a member of the Leadership Team will respond!

Happy New Year!

Representing NORDP at the University of New Mexico Mentoring Institute

Mentoring Committee Members Jan Abramson, Paula Carney, and Geoffrey Pollock represented NORDP at the University of New Mexico Mentoring Institute in late October. Addressing the conference theme Mentoring in an Interconnected World, the Mentor Training Team developed “Virtual Mentoring: You’ll Never Walk Alone.” The presentation, presented virtually (of course), provided a high-level overview of the NORDP 1:1 Mentoring Program.

To support virtual mentoring, we discussed the importance of 1) developing expertise in mentor training, 2) adapting the Center for Improvement of Mentored Experiences in Research’s (CIMER) Entering Mentoring curriculum for Research Development Professionals, and 3) developing and piloting virtual mentor training workshops. Because the NORDP 1:1 Mentoring Program has always been virtual, there was a great amount of experience and best practices to share.

Using the Mentoring Relationship Roadmap, participants were led through the support of the 1-year mentoring program. We had the opportunity to share lessons learned and adaptations that have been made, as well as program successes. The idea could not be simpler: help less experienced colleagues navigate the professional landscape by sharing relevant knowledge and insights. NORDP Mentor Training Team members shared knowledge and insights to foster development of mentoring in broader professional settings.

The presentation was a collaboration of the Mentor Training Team, and an article based on the work will be published in The Chronicle of Mentoring & Coaching later this year. Special thanks to all who were involved!

Partlow, K., Widmer, D., Severan-Webb, E., Sengupta, S., Pollock, G., Goff-Albritton, R., Finch, T., Dickey, E., Boman, K., Abramson, J., Carney, P. Virtual Mentoring: You’ll Never Walk Alone. The Chronicle of Mentoring & Coaching. Vol 5 (December 2021, Special Issue 14) pp 574-580.

Update on NORDP 2022 Conference

Dear NORDP Community,

As you all have been planning and drafting abstracts, our conference co-chairs and leadership have been working busily behind the scenes to assess the feasibility of holding an in-person conference next spring and consulting with event planners on the best path forward.

After considering many variables, we have made the difficult decision to convert our planned event in Bellevue, WA, to a fully virtual conference; it will take place Monday-Thursday, April 25-28, 2022.

We know this decision will be met with mixed emotions–results of a recent survey showed a distinct split between members calling for an online event and those eager to get back to in-person conferences. We know that neither option is ideal for everyone, and the Executive Conference Committee will make recommendations to the Board for providing future options that accommodate our broad community.

Let me reiterate that our decision to move to a virtual conference this year was based on many factors, including the continued risk of COVID and safety of our members; the related financial struggles of some of our institutions (which have reduced professional development budgets for staff); institutional policies that continue to limit travel; the comfort level of members for convening in large groups; and the increased costs of venues paired with a likely decreased number of attendees (i.e., cost-effectiveness for members and the organization). 

Given the timing (this is the earliest we could make this announcement), our conference co-chairs have decided to extend the conference abstract deadline until Friday, November 26, 11:59 pm PST. We hope this provides an opportunity for members who wish to present at the conference, but who could not attend an in-person event.

I want to thank our 2022 conference co-chairs, Katie Shoaf and Becca Latimer, for their leadership, perseverance and flexibility under these uncertain circumstances, as well as our event planners at FirstPoint Management Resources for their hard work. We enjoyed a vibrant and engaging virtual conference in 2021, and we learned valuable lessons that will yield an even more successful 2022 event.

You may contact rdconf@nordp.org with questions.

With much gratitude during this Thanksgiving season,

Jill Jividen, NORDP President, 2021-22

To view the full competition and submit your abstract, click here: View competition

NORDP fosters a culture of inclusive excellence by actively promoting and supporting diversity, inclusion and equity in all its forms to expand our worldview, enrich our work, and elevate our profession.

Virtual pilot short course for early career RD professionals

November 8, 2021 – December 17, 2021 • Seats are limited!

REGISTER NOW

What is research development (RD)? How is it done? Even professionals who have worked extensively with funded research and researchers throughout their careers may feel like they only understand their specific jobs and responsibilities. Because RD roles in organizations and institutions vary (and units are often siloed), it can be hard to get a full picture of RD as a field and how it fits into the research enterprise. RD101 will help you understand the field, expand your existing skill set, and explore new ways to support research at your institution.

NORDP is once again offering a pilot virtual short course, RD 101, which introduces the field of RD. This 12.5-hour course (not including readings and other coursework) presents a framework for understanding who RD professionals are, the skills that make them effective in their roles, the hows and whys of what they do, and the resources they rely on.

There are no prerequisites for RD 101; it is intended for new RD professionals (those with fewer than two years of experience in RD) or those considering becoming RD professionals. The instructors are experienced RD professionals from a range of institutions (e.g., centralized and decentralized, R1s, PUIs) and have designed the course around the skills and information they wish they’d had when they first entered the profession.

Course topics include:

  • What is RD? Who is the RD Professional?
  • Components and Elements of the RD Process—Institutional and Professional Cultures and How They Affect the Work of RD
  • RFPs and Proposals: Requirements and Constraints
  • Helping Researchers Produce Effective Proposals

In addition to the weekly meetings, you will have additional activities to contextualize yourself and your position within the RD profession. The course will help you to develop a personal career development plan.

General sessions: Mondays 1:00pm – 2:30pm ET (November 8, 15, 29, December 6 & 13)

Breakout sessions (choose one per week):

  • Thursdays 12:00pm – 1:00pm ET (November 18, December 2, 9, & 16)
  • Fridays 12:00pm – 1:00pm ET (November 12*, 19, December 3, 10, & 17)

* Two break out rooms will be hosted on Friday, November 12 to accommodate the Veteran’s Day Holiday

This pilot will be filled on a first-come, first-served basis. Please confirm that you will be able to attend ALL course meetings and one breakout session prior to registering. There will not be a waitlist. There is no charge for this pilot workshop, but registrants must be NORDP members. Future RD 101 offerings will have a registration fee. Future offerings will be announced in early 2022.

Registration is limited to 25 participants. Registration closes Tuesday, November 2, 2021.

For questions or more information, please contact Joanna.Downer@duke.edu or Faye.Farmer@asu.edu.

Registration link HERE.

Facilitators:

Paige Belisle, Harvard University – While pursuing a MFA in Writing at the University of New Hampshire, Paige Belisle discovered her career path by serving as a graduate student intern in UNH’s Research Development Office. Through NORDP, she met the members of Harvard University’s Faculty of Arts and Sciences Research Development Office and joined their team in 2016. She serves faculty members by identifying funding opportunities and providing proposal development support. Her current specialty is in providing Research Development outreach to new faculty members in the arts and humanities, as well as assembling monthly funding opportunities newsletters.

Katie Shoaf, Appalachian State University – Katie Shoaf is the Associate Director for Grants Resources and Services at Appalachian State University. She holds an M.A. and M.L.S. from Appalachian State. She has been a NORDP member since 2017 and serves on the Mentoring Committee and the Professional Development Committee. In the Office of Research at Appalachian, she administers limited submission competitions, internal competitions, and the internal peer review process. She is also charged with developing the international research process and opportunities for the Office of Research.

NORDP fosters a culture of inclusive excellence by actively promoting and supporting diversity, inclusion and equity in all its forms to expand our worldview, enrich our work, and elevate our profession.

Announcing NORDP Annual Conference 2022 Call for Abstracts

We are pleased to announce the launch of the NORDP Annual Conference 2022 Call for Abstracts. Click HERE to access the full competition in InfoReady. Thank you!


  • Internal Submission Deadline: Friday, November 19, 2021
  • Award Cycle: NORDP 2022

Abstracts are now being accepted for the 14th Annual Research Development Conference, hosted by the National Organization of Research Development Professionals (NORDP) the last week in April 2022.

Please note that the final format of the conference has yet to be finalized due to the evolving public health situation around COVID-19.

Several different conference session formats are available, as described below. Regardless of the session format, proposers should consider how their presentations and workshops will:

  • Demonstrate ways in which research development professionals support, encourage, and empower researchers to try new things—to create and mobilize knowledge, to respond to new funding mechanisms and pursue multi-disciplinary grants, or to participate in campus think-tanks or networking events.
  • Explore new approaches used in research development programs.
  • Explore creative resources for personal and career development.
  • Emphasize the innovative roles and value of research development within the broader research enterprise.
  • Contribute to strategic research planning at the institutional level.

Format Options

Workshops
FOUR HOURS / 2 to 4 presenters (recommended)
Allow participants to interactively explore a topic in-depth, led by teams of two to four facilitators (two is the minimum). Facilitators should use the long format to allow for more holistic discussion, to facilitate interactive activities, and/or to involve participants fully in the session. Audience size at these sessions is anticipated to be around 30 participants; however, facilitators can choose a size appropriate for their topic. Applicants should provide a clear rationale for the need to have four hours to accomplish the goals of the session; how they will provide intensive, interactive learning activities and/or professional development opportunities; and how they will deliver identified learning objectives and take-home materials. Preparatory and developmental coaching around adult learning will be available for all teams developing workshops, and a stipend will be provided for facilitators to compensate for the time spent developing a workshop. Applications require description of:

  1. Proposed learning objectives, workshop competencies, and/or tangible outcomes;
  2. Format, lesson plan, and curriculum overview;
  3. Learning environment and connection to inclusive excellence (i.e., description of how the facilitators will develop a positive learning environment and support NORDP’s inclusive excellence goals);
  4. Target audience(s), i.e., RD roles and positions, levels of knowledge/experience, academic disciplines, institution type;
  5. Facilitator expertise and qualifications (related to workshop content and delivering interactive sessions).

Oral Presentations
Intended for individual or group presentations, and are most effective when they address a significant overarching issue, problem, or hot topic in research development and/or showcase data, solutions, and programs from an array of institutions or perspectives. These sessions should be informational and may be accompanied by supplementary materials.

  • TWENTY-MINUTE sessions / up to 3 presenters (recommended)
  • ONE-HOUR sessions / up to 4 presenters (recommended)
  • NINETY-MINUTE sessions / up to 4 presenters (recommended). Ninety-minute sessions allow presenters to discuss a topic with more depth and interactively; proposals should therefore describe why ninety minutes are needed for the presentation.

Please avoid presenting case studies from a single institution or program; case studies are more appropriate for a poster or lightning talk.

Lightning Talks
FIVE-MINUTE presentations / 1 presenter (recommended)
A fun and fast-paced opportunity for individuals to share new and creative ideas for fostering research development. Based on Ignite (http://www.ignitetalks.io/), presentations are limited to five minutes and <20 slides. Please consider aligning with one of the following themes: Faculty Development; Interdisciplinary Research; Funding & Funders; RD Professional Development. If these do not apply, please indicate “Other.”

Lightning Storm
ONE-HOUR presentations / up 6 presenters total (recommended)
If you would like to propose a series of lightning talks (i.e., a “lightning storm”), please reach out to the conference organizers directly at rdconf@nordp.org.

Roundtables
ONE-HOUR sessions / up to 3 presenters (recommended)
A discussion focused on a specific RD issue. Roundtables encourage networking and sharing of individual experiences. Applicants should provide a description of the topic and its relevance to NORDP members and be willing to lead the discussion.

You may submit more than one abstract. Each submission should be for one type of session; if you are submitting separate/distinct abstracts, then multiple applications are required.

For each submission, please identify the audience for whom the content is targeted:

Fundamental: The session is aimed at providing knowledge and content fundamental to RD. Content may be appropriate for individuals interested in or new to RD, individuals already in RD but whose job responsibilities do not currently include the indicated topic, or those who want a refresher.

Intermediate: Content in these sessions is fundamental to RD but most relevant to individuals who have been involved in RD (or the given topic) for more than one year. This information can also be useful to individuals thinking about the next steps in their career or skills/responsibilities they want to gain.

Advanced: Content in these sessions is relevant to and aimed at individuals who already have significant skills in the given topic, who have or are working toward leadership roles in RD (including those who are “offices of one”), and/or who have an institutional leadership role or advise institutional leaders. This information can also be useful to experienced individuals thinking about their next career steps or skills/responsibilities they want to gain.

To view the full competition and submit your abstract, click here: View competition

NORDP fosters a culture of inclusive excellence by actively promoting and supporting diversity, inclusion and equity in all its forms to expand our worldview, enrich our work, and elevate our profession.

A Quick Chat about Peer Mentoring Groups (PMGs)

To all members, as we begin a new year of mentoring, the NORDP Mentoring Committee offers Peer Mentoring Groups (PMGs). The seven PMGs are formed based on the corresponding Research Development pillars and provide an ideal platform for NORDP members to network with and learn from each other. We invite you to join a PMG! PMG sign-up is currently open at Wisdom Share.

Recently Melissa Li, Program Manager, Joint Institute for Translational & Clinical Research, University of Michigan joined the Leadership & Management PMG as a co-lead. Melissa interviewed the other co-lead, Katie Shoaf, Associate Director, Grants Resources & Services, Appalachian State University, about her PMG experience.

Melissa: First of all, what is the scope of activities of the Leadership & Management PMG? 

Katie: We cover everything from managing up to growing an RD office, supporting career development, and navigating conflicts. Anything that the group wants to chat about is on the table. Naturally, we spent a lot of time last year debriefing about the impacts of COVID on our workplace interactions. 

Melissa: What prompted you to join the PMG? Could you share a couple of PMG highlights since you joined the group? 

Katie: I have been involved with PMGs since the beginning. I serve on the Mentoring committee and the MESHH (mentorship, expertise, support, helping hands) subgroup that developed some of the tools to support the PMGs as they got started. Mentoring is so important, and I love the atmosphere of a support group clustered around an area of passion for folks. The Leadership & Management PMG has been a great fit. I’m in a quasi-leadership role as an Associate Director, but am very interested in professional development around leadership, so it’s been great to learn from my peers in this group. I’ve developed some really amazing relationships with my PMG cohort. It’s a different vibe than other committee work and other mentoring relationships, and has allowed me to grow alongside people I greatly respect. 

Melissa: Your PMG experience sounds great. How has the experience impacted your professional work? 

Katie: As with most mentoring and NORDP-related things, I learn so much from my peers and it is all translatable into my daily work. I get ideas about how to work better with others and positively impact research culture on my campus. There are also a lot of aspirational things that we discuss in these groups that spark discussions in my own office about long-term goals for RD on our campus. 

Melissa: The PMGs are currently open for sign-up. Any words to those who are considering/debating to join? 

Katie: Do it! It has been so great to build relationships in these types of groups. We support each other, share ideas, discuss our fears and areas of growth. It is a great, low-stakes way to get involved, meet new people, and leverage your NORDP membership. 

Melissa: Thank you so much for sharing your PMG experience and encouraging notes, Katie.

An overview on PMGs is available here. PMG sign-up is currently open at Wisdom Share. See this blog for more information on signing up for PMGs this year.

Please join us for a PMG Orientation on October 21 at 2:30-3:30pm EST. The Zoom link is https://us02web.zoom.us/j/81529400705.

NROAD is on the LMS

Have a new RD colleague you need to onboard? Has a postdoc reached out to you interested in interning in your office? Are you worried about how you will help them make inroads into RD?

Fear not! 

NROAD to RD is here to help!

The NORDP Resource for Organizing and ADapting a Training Program toward Developing an RD career (N-ROAD to RD) was developed to do just that! NROAD to RD is a resource that provides RD offices with a framework to 1) develop their own training/apprenticeship/internship programs, and 2) to employ that framework to introduce, recruit, and train individuals interested in a RD careers. NROAD to RD was first developed in 2019, has been accessed by over 100 RD offices, and has been very well received, used mostly for onboarding new team members. 

NROAD can now be accessed through the NORDP Learning Management System. You can reach NROAD directly by clicking here. You will have to Register to use it.

It can also be accessed through the LMS here: click on Course Categories at the top and then on the Career and Professional Development tab.

Kimberly Patten, Assistant Vice President of Research Development at  University of Arizona was one of the first adopters of NROAD and says this about NROAD:

“At the University of Arizona we’ve been using core components of the NROAD document as part of our onboarding process. The two components that have been most beneficial are the curated reading list and the job-shadowing and mentorship component. The reading list is concise enough that it provides a nice overview of research development for our new hires, especially those that are brand new to the field. We call the job-shadowing and mentoring component co-review and frankly, that extends beyond new hires to all of our large proposal efforts. While we do try to have consistency in our review process, human nature is such that we all have areas of expertise and skill, and leveraging the experience of two research development professionals only improves the proposal for the faculty (or team). I truly believe that research development professionals need to be responsive to a number of personalities and learning styles; building a toolkit of tips and techniques that work for a variety of situations takes time to develop and is only improved when there’s the opportunity to work collaboratively with other research development professionals. It’s why I appreciate the NORDP community so much.”

We hope NROAD meets all of your internship, training and onboarding needs!

Nominations for 2022 NORDP Awards due Dec. 1

NORDP offers a number of member-nominated awards to shine a spotlight on the outstanding accomplishments of individuals making exemplary contributions to the organization as well as the profession and/or field of research development.

Each year, NORDP members are invited to submit nominations for the Innovation Award, Leadership Award, Rising Star Award, and NORDP Fellow designation. These awards honor NORDP member’s commitment to excellence and impact and recognize the contributions member-leaders make to the research development community. 

Consider nominating someone you know who is moving the needle on:

  • strategic research advancement;
  • communication of research and research opportunities;
  • enhancing research collaboration, team science, or research leadership capacity; or
  • proposal development. 

The deadline for submitting nominations for NORDP Awards to be given in 2022 is 8:00 p.m. EDT/5:00 p.m. PDT on Wednesday, December 1, 2021. Nominations must be submitted via InfoReady.

An informational webinar about the NORDP Awards process featuring an overview of award types and the nomination preparation and review processes will be held on Friday, October 29, at 2:00 p.m. EDT/11:00 a.m. PDT.

Registration is required and may be completed here. For more information about member recognitions, visit the NORDP Awards website.

NORDP fosters a culture of inclusive excellence by actively promoting and supporting diversity, inclusion and equity in all its forms to expand our worldview, enrich our work, and elevate our profession.

International Network of Research Management Societies (INORMS) Report: The Hiroshima Statement

The Hiroshima Statement on Essential Practice of Research Management and Administration was developed as part of the INORMS 2021 Congress, which was originally planned to be held in Hiroshima, Japan. On May 24, 2021, the INORMS Council convened a virtual meeting. During the meeting, Dr. Koetsu Yamazaki, Chair of RMAN-J, the Research Manager and Administrator Network in Japan and host of the international Congress, completed the Hiroshima Statement by signing the document.

Top left, Dr. Yamazaki signs the Hiroshima Statement during the virtual INORMS 2021 Congress.

The statement (see link here) highlights a set of five principles and responsibilities common to the collective memberships of INORMS member associations. Research Managers around the world face similar challenges and aspire to a common goal: to improve our local, national, and global research landscapes. INORMS Council hopes to promote interactions, sharing of best practices and joint activities between member societies to benefit the professional development of individual members worldwide.

Karen Eck, Assistant Vice President for Research at Old Dominion University and Co-chair of the Strategic Alliances Committee, is currently representing NORDP on the INORMS Council. Kim Patten, Assistant Vice President, Research Development at the University of Arizona, is representing NORDP on the INORMS Working Group.