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A Message from NORDP’s President

NORDP President (2021-2022) Jill Jividen

It has been a challenging year for all of us–from a global pandemic, to a national reckoning with racial injustice, to political turmoil. We have experienced anxiety, uncertainty, fear, frustration, exhaustion; some of us have experienced tremendous loss. We have tapped into enormous wells of community and creativity and empathy and fortitude for our personal and professional well-being. We keep swimming.

While many institutions and organizations may face ongoing financial and other uncertainties wrought by the pandemic, I’m pleased to assure you that NORDP has emerged from the year stronger than ever. We have sustained membership (nearly 1,100 members from more that 460 institutions) and recently enjoyed a high-energy virtual conference with a record number of attendees–more than 700–with revenue that will help us realize long-time, long-term goals. Our current priorities include:

  • developing programming for NORDP members at all professional levels–from those just entering RD to experienced members who are looking toward leadership advancement and institutional strategy;
  • providing resources and training to help members incorporate DEIB best practices in their RD work and professional goals;
  • doing the hard work and “heart work” (thank you, Etta Ward, for introducing me to that term!) of ensuring that NORDP is a diverse, welcoming and inclusive organization;
  • providing a pipeline and mentorship to encourage interest in and build confidence to pursue leadership roles in NORDP, and
  • improving communications, so members can know what programs and activities are available to them and use our website as a valuable tool for connection and resources.

Everywhere you look, NORDP is a hive of activity.

There are more reasons for optimism. Research Development continues to grow, and there are signs that the field will be critical to the success of our institutional research activities. The current administration has shown renewed vigor in funding research at the federal level, not only to address complex challenges (e.g., climate change, energy, infrastructure), but to keep the U.S. competitive globally in science and technology. The National Science Foundation (NSF) may see a new directorate and is anticipating a significant overall budget increase. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has launched the UNITE initiative toward ending structural racism, dedicating new funding to health equity research and efforts to diversify the scientific workforce, while continuing to roll out new multidisciplinary initiatives, like Bridge2AI. These new investments position RD professionals as essential staff, as we support researchers in pursuing funding, building effective teams and harnessing innovation for solutions.

This is an exciting time to be a Research Development professional, and no better time to engage with NORDP.

As the Board of Directors begins its new year, I want to express a heartfelt thank you to the outstanding directors who have wrapped up their service: Rachel Dresbeck, Jennifer Lyon Gardner, Jeri Hansen and Karen Fletcher. We are welcoming five new directors this month: Antje Harnisch, Jennifer Glass, Melinda Boehm, Carolynn Julien and Lisa Lopez; additionally, director Nathan Meier is returning for a new term.

I especially want to express gratitude to the MANY volunteers who make NORDP such a vibrant and rewarding community. Time is our most precious resource; thank you for giving yours to this organization.

Finally, I want to ensure that NORDP leaders are accessible to members. I will be offering opportunities for members to connect with me and other NORDP leaders via Zoom over the next year. Keep an eye on the NORDP events calendar for more information. And remember that you can reach out to me anytime at president@nordp.org.

Throughout the year, please make use of the listserv to ask your colleagues about RD and subscribe to the NORDP Blog for relevant NORDP and RD news.

I look forward to working with all of you in the coming year (and seeing you next spring in Bellevue, Washington)!

Sincerely, Jill Jividen

Jill Jividen, PhD
Director of Research Development
University of Michigan
Office of the Vice President for Research

A Quick Chat about Peer Mentoring Groups (PMGs)

To all members, as we begin a new year of mentoring, the NORDP Mentoring Committee offers Peer Mentoring Groups (PMGs). The seven PMGs are formed based on the corresponding Research Development pillars and provide an ideal platform for NORDP members to network with and learn from each other. We invite you to join a PMG! PMG sign-up is currently open at Wisdom Share.

Recently Melissa Li, Program Manager, Joint Institute for Translational & Clinical Research, University of Michigan joined the Leadership & Management PMG as a co-lead. Melissa interviewed the other co-lead, Katie Shoaf, Associate Director, Grants Resources & Services, Appalachian State University, about her PMG experience.

Melissa: First of all, what is the scope of activities of the Leadership & Management PMG? 

Katie: We cover everything from managing up to growing an RD office, supporting career development, and navigating conflicts. Anything that the group wants to chat about is on the table. Naturally, we spent a lot of time last year debriefing about the impacts of COVID on our workplace interactions. 

Melissa: What prompted you to join the PMG? Could you share a couple of PMG highlights since you joined the group? 

Katie: I have been involved with PMGs since the beginning. I serve on the Mentoring committee and the MESHH (mentorship, expertise, support, helping hands) subgroup that developed some of the tools to support the PMGs as they got started. Mentoring is so important, and I love the atmosphere of a support group clustered around an area of passion for folks. The Leadership & Management PMG has been a great fit. I’m in a quasi-leadership role as an Associate Director, but am very interested in professional development around leadership, so it’s been great to learn from my peers in this group. I’ve developed some really amazing relationships with my PMG cohort. It’s a different vibe than other committee work and other mentoring relationships, and has allowed me to grow alongside people I greatly respect. 

Melissa: Your PMG experience sounds great. How has the experience impacted your professional work? 

Katie: As with most mentoring and NORDP-related things, I learn so much from my peers and it is all translatable into my daily work. I get ideas about how to work better with others and positively impact research culture on my campus. There are also a lot of aspirational things that we discuss in these groups that spark discussions in my own office about long-term goals for RD on our campus. 

Melissa: The PMGs are currently open for sign-up. Any words to those who are considering/debating to join? 

Katie: Do it! It has been so great to build relationships in these types of groups. We support each other, share ideas, discuss our fears and areas of growth. It is a great, low-stakes way to get involved, meet new people, and leverage your NORDP membership. 

Melissa: Thank you so much for sharing your PMG experience and encouraging notes, Katie.

An overview on PMGs is available here. PMG sign-up is currently open at Wisdom Share. See this blog for more information on signing up for PMGs this year.

Please join us for a PMG Orientation on October 21 at 2:30-3:30pm EST. The Zoom link is https://us02web.zoom.us/j/81529400705.

NROAD is on the LMS

Have a new RD colleague you need to onboard? Has a postdoc reached out to you interested in interning in your office? Are you worried about how you will help them make inroads into RD?

Fear not! 

NROAD to RD is here to help!

The NORDP Resource for Organizing and ADapting a Training Program toward Developing an RD career (N-ROAD to RD) was developed to do just that! NROAD to RD is a resource that provides RD offices with a framework to 1) develop their own training/apprenticeship/internship programs, and 2) to employ that framework to introduce, recruit, and train individuals interested in a RD careers. NROAD to RD was first developed in 2019, has been accessed by over 100 RD offices, and has been very well received, used mostly for onboarding new team members. 

NROAD can now be accessed through the NORDP Learning Management System. You can reach NROAD directly by clicking here. You will have to Register to use it.

It can also be accessed through the LMS here: click on Course Categories at the top and then on the Career and Professional Development tab.

Kimberly Patten, Assistant Vice President of Research Development at  University of Arizona was one of the first adopters of NROAD and says this about NROAD:

“At the University of Arizona we’ve been using core components of the NROAD document as part of our onboarding process. The two components that have been most beneficial are the curated reading list and the job-shadowing and mentorship component. The reading list is concise enough that it provides a nice overview of research development for our new hires, especially those that are brand new to the field. We call the job-shadowing and mentoring component co-review and frankly, that extends beyond new hires to all of our large proposal efforts. While we do try to have consistency in our review process, human nature is such that we all have areas of expertise and skill, and leveraging the experience of two research development professionals only improves the proposal for the faculty (or team). I truly believe that research development professionals need to be responsive to a number of personalities and learning styles; building a toolkit of tips and techniques that work for a variety of situations takes time to develop and is only improved when there’s the opportunity to work collaboratively with other research development professionals. It’s why I appreciate the NORDP community so much.”

We hope NROAD meets all of your internship, training and onboarding needs!

Nominations for 2022 NORDP Awards due Dec. 1

NORDP offers a number of member-nominated awards to shine a spotlight on the outstanding accomplishments of individuals making exemplary contributions to the organization as well as the profession and/or field of research development.

Each year, NORDP members are invited to submit nominations for the Innovation Award, Leadership Award, Rising Star Award, and NORDP Fellow designation. These awards honor NORDP member’s commitment to excellence and impact and recognize the contributions member-leaders make to the research development community. 

Consider nominating someone you know who is moving the needle on:

  • strategic research advancement;
  • communication of research and research opportunities;
  • enhancing research collaboration, team science, or research leadership capacity; or
  • proposal development. 

The deadline for submitting nominations for NORDP Awards to be given in 2022 is 8:00 p.m. EDT/5:00 p.m. PDT on Wednesday, December 1, 2021. Nominations must be submitted via InfoReady.

An informational webinar about the NORDP Awards process featuring an overview of award types and the nomination preparation and review processes will be held on Friday, October 29, at 2:00 p.m. EDT/11:00 a.m. PDT.

Registration is required and may be completed here. For more information about member recognitions, visit the NORDP Awards website.

NORDP fosters a culture of inclusive excellence by actively promoting and supporting diversity, inclusion and equity in all its forms to expand our worldview, enrich our work, and elevate our profession.

International Network of Research Management Societies (INORMS) Report: The Hiroshima Statement

The Hiroshima Statement on Essential Practice of Research Management and Administration was developed as part of the INORMS 2021 Congress, which was originally planned to be held in Hiroshima, Japan. On May 24, 2021, the INORMS Council convened a virtual meeting. During the meeting, Dr. Koetsu Yamazaki, Chair of RMAN-J, the Research Manager and Administrator Network in Japan and host of the international Congress, completed the Hiroshima Statement by signing the document.

Top left, Dr. Yamazaki signs the Hiroshima Statement during the virtual INORMS 2021 Congress.

The statement (see link here) highlights a set of five principles and responsibilities common to the collective memberships of INORMS member associations. Research Managers around the world face similar challenges and aspire to a common goal: to improve our local, national, and global research landscapes. INORMS Council hopes to promote interactions, sharing of best practices and joint activities between member societies to benefit the professional development of individual members worldwide.

Karen Eck, Assistant Vice President for Research at Old Dominion University and Co-chair of the Strategic Alliances Committee, is currently representing NORDP on the INORMS Council. Kim Patten, Assistant Vice President, Research Development at the University of Arizona, is representing NORDP on the INORMS Working Group.

NORDP New Board Member Cameo – Antje Harnisch

Who: Antje Harnisch, Assistant Vice Provost for Research

Where: Worcester Polytechnic Institute

Number of Years in RD:  RA and RD 20+

Length of NORDP Membership: 5 years

When and how did you enter the field? What kind of RD work do you do?

I entered the field through Research Administration 20-plus years ago. I spent the first 15 years at a land-grant R1 university, and I’ve been at a small technical university for the past seven years. There I have helped set up a research development office (RSI), participated in recruitment efforts, mentored the hires, and facilitated attempts at defining roles and responsibilities between OSP and RSI. Our team helps faculty with their proposals, provides training, and runs internal grant opportunities and limited submissions. 

What’s your history with NORDP? How have you engaged with the organization?

I have participated at the regional level for a number of years and have been involved at the national level for the past four years. I have presented at a regional conference, and we have hosted one at WPI, which was a great experience. It was truly a pleasure to work with Northeast NORDP leadership to put the conference together and arrange logistics to make the event a success. I’ve also participated in leadership roundtables and found them consistently informative and inspiring exchanges of information, experiences, best practices, and last but not least, a sense of community. I always went away with new ideas and feeling a sense of belonging. 

What relationships have you built as a result of NORDP ?

I’ve appreciated the role that NORDP has played in representing and shaping this profession. I have been consistently impressed with the colleagues that make up the group and the programming the organization provides. NORDP colleagues have proven to be a wonderful resource for me professionally and kindred spirits on a personal level too.

What are you most excited about as a board member?

I appreciate sitting on the NORDP board as an opportunity to learn and grow through working with and learning from colleagues who I respect and with whom I share passions, goals, and values. I’m excited about contributing to the implementation of the current strategic plan and engage in future strategizing to move NORDP and the profession into the future.

Compiled by Sharon Pound, Communications Working Group

Save the Dates: Expand your network by participating in the NORDP Peer Mentoring Groups!

One mentor is almost never adequate for the mentee. [The PMG] helped us to focus on what we could address”- Jennifer Glass, NORDP Board member and Mentoring Committee member. 

The NORDP Mentoring Committee’s Peer Mentoring Groups* (PMG)  provide an ideal platform for NORDP colleagues to learn from each other. NORDP Mentoring Committee currently has 7 PMGs Peer Mentoring Groups, based on the pillars of Research Development. 

1.     Career & Professional Development: exploring how to become more efficient and effective in our roles

2.     Communication: promoting awareness of RD opportunities and publicizing research

3.     Enhancing Collaboration: building collaborations and interdisciplinary research programs

4.     Leadership & Management: leading in both official and unofficial capacities

5.     Mentorship: discussing and supporting mentoring best practices for mentors and mentees

6.     Proposal Development: supporting faculty grant seeking and increasing extramural funding

7.     Strategic Planning & Advancement: guiding policy and planning for enhanced research and scholarship

Learn more about PMGs here.

This year PMGs will use the Wisdom Share platform (https://nordpmentoring.mywisdomshare.com), which is the same platform that NORDP uses for its mentoring program.  Please mark your calendars for the following dates:

October 1, 2021 PMG sign-up opens in Wisdom Share: You can begin to sign up for one (or all 7!) of the PMGs. Signup will be open October 1. 

To sign up for a PMG:

  1. If you’ve not yet registered in Wisdom Share, sign up with a login and password here
  2. Under “Role,” choose “Peer Mentoring.”
  3. On your dashboard’s far right side, you will see the PMGs; simply click join for the group(s) of interest.

Already-registered users can go directly to their dashboards.

October 21, 2021 – 2:30-3:30pm EST PMG Orientation  – Come join your PMG colleagues to learn about the process, Wisdom Share functionality, and meet as a group. The Orientation will include an introduction to the seven PMGs, engaging in PMGs on Wisdom Share, and an opportunity to get acquainted with the PMGs real-time. Click here to join the orientation: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/81529400705

* Participation in Peer Mentoring Groups (PMGs)  is one of the many benefits of being a member of NORDP.

NORDP New Board Member Cameo – Melinda Laroco Boehm

Who: Melinda Laroco Boehm, Director, Office of Research Development

Where: University of California, Merced

Number of Years in RD: 6.5

Length of NORDP Membership: 6.5

When and how did you enter the field? What kind of RD work do you do?

I came into RD just after completing my Ph.D. in Medical Sociology (2014). Given we were a military family, we had orders for an international move just a few months after I completed my degree, so I purposefully delayed entering the job market. Looking back, I am grateful to have been afforded the time to really look for what I wanted to do and contribute, which was somewhere in the vicinity of an intersection of research, a deadline-driven environment, community engagement, and strategic initiatives. After those international orders were changed to California, I saw just the opportunity for what I wanted to pursue: Research Development. At UC Merced, we are a centralized unit, supporting all schools and organized research units in strategic grantseeking, proposal development support to faculty researchers, and initiatives to grow our research enterprise.

What’s your history with NORDP? How have you engaged with the organization?

You could say my career in RD aligns exactly with my time in NORDP. The NORDP 2015 Conference in Bethesda was (technically) my first day on the job. After driving for three days on a cross-country move, I interviewed at UC Merced the day after we arrived in California. Susan Carter was conference co-chair at the time and thought it was perfect timing for me to fly back cross country to the conference. It was there I met most of my new colleagues.

Since then I’ve remained active on the Professional Development Committee. I’ve attended every conference since 2015 and participated in the annual conferences in numerous capacities: Conference Planning Committee, mentee activities, workshop facilitations, panel discussions, roundtable discussions, and participation in Implicit Bias Training (2019). Over the past year I’ve remained PD Committee Co-Chair, engaged in Conversation Roadblock Sessions, presented at our Pacific Region Meeting, contributed to the CCC Task Force, and am currently in the LEAD Peer Mentoring Group. I also fully support (and encourage) my staff to contribute and participate in any capacity for the organization.

What relationships have you built as a result of NORDP?

I’ve built myriad relationships as a result of NORDP. Former colleagues have become my conference workshop co-presenters and dear friends. I’ve created my own version of a Board of Advisors made up of my peers/peer mentors, and their counsel, strategic advice, and sarcasm have helped me redirect my focus many times and solve challenges in positive and meaningful ways.

What are you most excited about as a board member?

I’m excited to better understand the infrastructure and governance aspect of the Board. If you know me, you’d know I am detail-oriented with a fondness (understatement) for organization, so I am looking forward to that aspect.

However, I’m most excited about meeting more NORDP members, hearing their thoughts and ideas, and helping to serve as a catalyst in elevating their innovative ideas to create effective (and sustainable) change. As a collective, NORDP members are some of the most innovative and strategic thinkers I’ve ever known, and I want to help ensure we are meeting the needs and interests of our members in a helpful, culturally-competent, and mission-driven way.

Compiled by Sharon Pound, Communications Working Group

Mentor Dyad Reflections: Jessica Brassard/David Widmer

We hope you are enjoying the opening months of the 2021-2022 NORDP Mentoring Program and that you have had a chance to meet in your dyad! We are excited to share a piece of Mentoring Reflection by introducing Mentor David Widmer, Manager of Research Development and Outreach at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, and Mentee Jessica Brassard, who recently transitioned from Michigan Technological University to a Graphic Designer position in the University of Michigan’s Research Development Office. Jess and David were paired for the 2020-2021 mentoring year and are continuing their engagement beyond the official program.

Short bios

David Widmer, PhD, is the Grants & Contracts Manager of Research Development & Outreach at Memorial Sloan Kettering (MSK) and has 20 years of research administration and research development experience.  David manages the G&C Funding Development Team (FDT) now in its 12th year of providing proposal development and funding acquisition support to MSK researchers. David’s outreach and training has focused on developing specific populations of investigators including junior faculty and post-doctoral researchers. David was part of the first NORDP mentoring class in 2011, has served on the Mentoring Committee since 2015, and served as MC co-chair from 2017-2021. This was his fifth year as a mentor. David is a Fulbright Scholar, a recipient of a Swiss Confederation fellowship, and has an MS in Cell & Developmental Biology, an MA in Humanities and Social Thought with a concentration in the History of Medicine, and a PhD in Behavioral & Molecular Neuroscience. 

Jessica Brassard is the Graphic Designer in the University of Michigan’s OVPR Research Development office. Jessica has a long background in fine art, design, and marketing and transitioned to research development in 2015 when she joined the Michigan Technological University RD team. She has experience with what we might think of as “core” RD responsibilities (faculty development, proposal development, strategic initiatives, workshops and training) but she has always loved the chance to work on visuals for proposals and science communication. She creates visuals that increase clarity and saliency for proposals and OVPR initiatives. This will be the fourth year that Jessica has participated in the NORDP Mentoring Program. She has been both a mentee, a mentor, and participated in a PMG or two. This year, she joined the Mentoring Committee and is focusing on the McMc (Mentoring Committee Marketing (sub)Committee). In all aspects of her life, Jessica strives to find ways to improve the world around her. 

  1. What influenced you to apply to be a mentor and a mentee for the 2020-21 NORDP Mentoring Program?
  1. JB — I believe I can learn something from everyone I meet. The NORDP Mentoring Program does a great job of creating opportunities to meet, build relationships, and learn from each other. 
  2. DW — My experience with the NORDP mentoring program previously has been very positive. I was in the first mentoring class in 2011 and my mentor helped me during a pivotal transition in my career of moving from Research Administration to Research Development. When I came to the Mentoring Committee in 2015, I started up again first as a mentee and then transitioned as both mentor and mentee. This upcoming year will be my fifth year as a mentor. My experiences with all my mentors drive me to want to pay it forward and the learning that happens with my mentee makes me want to mentor again. And by learning, I mean I learn from my mentees because I do every time. The mentoring experience shows that we all have something to share and that you might be in a better position to serve as a mentor now than you may think.
  3. What was your favorite part about your relationship?
  1. JB — As I have gotten to know David, I have enjoyed learning about his background. David has generously shared his published work which I have read and found fascinating. I enjoy spending time reflecting on the challenges he has faced over the past year in his institution and the issues I face in my institution. Having David’s perspective helps me reflect more clearly because he sees things from an outside point-of-view while still having the context of our RD mission. 
  2. DW — The camaraderie! Jess and I really clicked and talked about so much more than RD. I feel we have crafted an important connection that will last beyond the mentoring year. I even benefited from her baking skills and received a care packet for the Holidays.
  3. What surprised you about being a mentor or a mentee?
  1. JB — During the process of using the NORPD mentoring packet to reflect on my own progress, goals, and network, I am surprised by the progress I’ve made year to year. And again at the end of a mentoring year, I am surprised by the incredible benefit of the conversations we’ve had, despite shifting work priorities and adjusted meetings over the year. 
  2. DW — What’s surprised me from the start of mentoring was the reciprocal learning that happens. I taught enrichment to seventh and eighth graders in graduate school and staying one step ahead of them in topics and subjects was a challenge since they gave me perspectives I never had before. Mentoring kids I think put me in good stead to be a NORDP mentor although previous mentoring experience is not by any means a prerequisite for supporting your RD colleagues in mentoring.
  3. How has participation in the Mentoring Program helped broaden your horizons about Research Development in general and/or affected your daily work in particular?
  1. JB — In this year of the COVID-19 pandemic, I have struggled with the amount of work I can maintain in our new way of living and working. The Mentoring Program has helped “right-size” my expectations to the realities. While this is being done at my institution and within my unit, it is also extremely helpful to get perspective with both David and my other mentee. 
  2. DW — Bringing back to one’s home institution is an important benefit of NORDP membership and the Mentoring Program has helped me learn and grow in RD, and have colleagues to share and brainstorm ideas with to take back to MSK. The dyads and the Peer Mentoring Groups are great for that but they wouldn’t be such a success if it weren’t for the fabulous open and sharing NORDP membership.
  3. Any words of wisdom or encouragement for those wanting to apply next year? Any other thoughts you would like to share? 
  1. JB — Don’t get caught up in the tasks you might add to your list of to-dos or the additional meetings you need to schedule. Think of this as a year-long opportunity to get to know another human and add to your network!
  2. DW — If you think you are not ready to mentor, think again. Everyone has something to share, differing experiences to discuss, and perspectives that will broaden the horizons of another program. I thank Jess for broadening my horizons in our mentoring partnership this year.

NORDP Consultant Pilot Program; Calling for Applications

With the generous support of Eric and Wendy Schmidt via recommendation of the Schmidt Futures program, NORDP is piloting a program to grow research capacity and competitiveness within historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) by increasing institutional capacity for research development. To develop and grow sustainable research support infrastructure, the awarded two-year pilot project will provide NORDP consultants—via either virtual engagement or in-person engagement—to participating HBCUs at no cost to the institutions.

NORDP is pleased to announce two opportunities to be a part of the NORDP Consultant pilot program.

  1. Please consider applying and share this opportunity with program evaluators in your network. The National Organization of Research Development Professionals (NORDP) requests proposals from experienced evaluators for the evaluation of a two-year pilot project that will create sustainable research support infrastructures at four participating HBCUs. The evaluator will provide formative and summative feedback to NORDP leadership and the HBCUs related to impacts and outcomes as aligned with project objectives. The evaluator will also provide recommendations to inform future programmatic decisions. A bidders conference will be held on September 21, 2021 at 12-1pm EDT. Proposals are due November 10, 2021. Additional information can be found in the RFP here.
  1. Please consider applying to serve as a NORDP Consultant. The National Organization of Research Development Professionals (NORDP) seeks applications from NORDP members to participate as NORDP Consultants in a two-year pilot project that will create sustainable research support infrastructures at four participating HBCUs. Proposals are due November 10, 2021. Additional information can be found in the RFA here.

The application process for HBCUs will also be announced in the upcoming weeks. HBCUs will be contacted directly and invited to apply.

NORDP New Board Member Cameo – Lisa Lopez

Who:   Lisa Lopez, Senior Research Development Officer

Where:   College of Health and Human Development, California State University, Fullerton

Number of Years in RD:  7

Length of NORDP Membership:   6

When and how did you enter the field? What kind of RD work do you do?

I entered RD after completing my postdoc. I was looking for an alternative career away from the typical research scientist trajectory, but I knew I still loved working in academia. The problem was that I didn’t have anyone in my network who could help me navigate a transition outside of the laboratory. When looking for jobs, I found various RD opportunities, but I had no clue if I would even be qualified for such a position. After a quick Google search, I found the NORDP website with information on the responsibilities of a “research development professional.” I read all I could find about this “new” profession and found that it was indeed something I was qualified for and could find rewarding. Most importantly, I found a community of folks who, while working at their own institutions, had a shared passion for RD and supported each other along the journey.  I started to apply for RD jobs and was fortunate to land at a local Cal State, where I’ve been ever since.

In my current role, I perform RD duties at the college level as a member of the Dean’s senior leadership team.  I work closely with my colleagues in the Office of Research and Sponsored Projects to put on grant-related trainings for faculty, and I work as part of the Pre-Award team for my college to help faculty submit proposals.  In my college, I focus on faculty development.  I provide guidance to help faculty position themselves for success in their research and as they seek external funding, and I develop and manage several college programs to support faculty research.  I am also involved in a college task force aimed at increasing the hiring and retention of diverse faculty. 

What’s your history with NORDP? How have you engaged with the organization?

I joined NORDP in 2015.  I started to attend the annual meetings and presented a poster in Colorado in 2017.  In 2020, I increased my engagement with NORDP and joined the Nomination Committee.  This was such a worthwhile experience, and I encourage anyone looking to get started in volunteer work with the organization to consider joining NomCom.  Committee work gave me insight into the organizational structure of NORDP and also exposed me to the skills and experiences of the Board candidates.  It was through my work on NomCom that I was able to see myself as a future member of the NORDP Board. 

What relationships have you built as a result of NORDP?

NORDP members are such a supportive and engaging group.  When I was new to RD, I really appreciated going to the annual conference and meeting and learning from members who had been in the field a lot longer than me.  I’ve also been fortunate to meet some really awesome members as part of the Nomination Committee.  This year, I’m taking part in the Mentorship Program as both a mentor and a mentee.  So far, I’ve really enjoyed the experience, and I’m incredibly thankful to have already met so many new folks as a participant in this summer’s Celebrating Mentoring Days.   

What are you most excited about as a board member?

NORDP is growing and changing, and I’m really excited to have the opportunity to be part of the leadership that will help shape what our organization looks like in the coming years as we prepare to develop our next strategic plan.  I’m also eager to meet more members and learn how others enhance their professional development and how institutions support the profession.  I’m interested in exploring the different models of RD at institutions and how NORDP can best meet the needs of our members in varied RD roles and from diverse backgrounds.  NORDP is now over 1,000 members strong, and it’s an exciting time to be involved in this organization.  I can’t wait to see what we all can accomplish in the years ahead!

Compiled by Sharon Pound, Communications Working Group