Nominations Open for NORDP 2019 Rising Star of Excellence Recognition Awards

Active NORDP members are invited to nominate deserving recipients for a NORDP 2019 Rising Star of Excellence Recognition Award for outstanding volunteer contributions to NORDP.  Awardees will be recognized with a lovely engraved glass plaque at the Annual Conference in Providence in April/May, and will receive waived registration for a future NORDP Annual Conference.

Nominee Eligibility: Any active NORDP member who has made significant volunteer contributions to NORDP and who exhibits strong potential for future contributions is eligible.  “Contributions” can include NORDP committee service, conference volunteer, conference presenter, etc.  Previous Rising Star Award recipients and Holly J. Falk-Krzesinski Service awardees are not eligible.  (For previous recipients and awardees, see https://www.nordp.org/service-award.)

Nominator Eligibility: Active NORDP members

Nomination Process: Each nomination consists of a completed form (see attached) that describes why the nominator feels the nominee deserves the Rising Star recognition.  The nominator should speak to past and current contributions to NORDP, the potential for future contributions to research development and/or NORDP, and examples of excellence in research development.

The nomination must also include a short statement (~50 words) to be used as a citation if the nominee is selected for this recognition.

Please send completed nomination forms to Member Services Committee chair Kathy Cataneo at k.cataneo@unh.edu no later than Wednesday, March 20 at 5 p.m. EST and use this in the email subject line: Rising Star Nomination for (nominee’s last name). The nomination form is here: Rising Star Nomination Form

Selection Process: The Awards Subcommittee of the Member Services Committee will review nomination materials and forward recommendations for awardees to the Board of Directors for its consideration.  Nominations will be evaluated on the extent to which the nominees have served NORDP and the research development profession, as documented by compelling evidence and testimonials in the nomination form.  The Board will select no more than three nominees for awards in any given year.

Awardees are announced and presented with their recognition plaques at the NORDP Annual Conference.

Posted on behalf of the Member Services Committee

Visit the NORDP Store online now through March 15! 

We hope to see you at the Conference, which will be held April 29 – May 1, 2019, at the Omni Providence Hotel in Providence, RI. For more information about the conference program or to register, visit http://www.nordp.org/conferences. Follow @NORDP_official on Twitter for all the latest #NORDP2019 updates.

NORDP fosters a culture of inclusive excellence by actively promoting and supporting diversity, inclusion and equity in all its forms to expand our worldview, enrich our work, and elevate our profession.

Conference Cameo: R. Krish

#NORDP2019 starts Monday, April 29, in Providence, RI. Keep checking back here at the blog and on our Twitter feed (@NORDP_official) for conference updates. Register at https://www.nordp.org/conferences.

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Who: R. Krish, Director of Research Services & Center Initiatives
Where: Prairie View A&M University
Number of years in research development: 3
Length of NORDP membership: 2 years
Number of NORDP conferences attended: 1
When you were a kid, what did you want to be when you grew up? A professor

I actually transitioned into research administration from the “dark side”—I always wanted to become a college professor. When I was a high school or college student, I loved watching movies that portrayed teachers or universities as the central theme. After getting a Master’s degree in chemistry, I worked for a couple of years in the Emulsion Department of a photo-film manufacturing company in India. I was so captivated by the Eastman Kodak research publications that I wanted to pursue doctoral studies at the Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT). However, a chemistry doctorate was not offered at RIT in 1978, so I earned my PhD from the University of California-Davis in 1983.Krish

Following post-doctoral work at Purdue and the University of Wisconsin-Madison, I had a fulfilling career as a faculty member in the Department of Biochemistry & Molecular Biophysics at Kansas State University, Manhattan from 1986 to 2015.

I left K-State to join my wife and son, as my wife, whom I first met at UC-Davis as a fellow graduate student with a bright smile, was hired by Texas A&M University at College Station. I joined Prairie View A&M University, a member of the Texas A&M University System (TAMUS), as Director of Research Services. I metamorphosed into Director of Research and Sponsored Programs the following year, and for a year and a half, I have been the Director of Research Services and Center Initiatives, overseeing, among other tasks, the performance of 14 research centers on the campus. Sponsored Research Services (SRS) at TAMUS prepared me well to take on a role I had no idea about before. I have attended annual conferences of SRAI and NCURA to augment my research administration knowledge.

I first attended the NORDP Annual Conference last year. I received information about the conference by email, and after going through the NORDP website, I very much wanted to attend the conference. And I am glad that I did! Networking with colleagues from other universities was fun. The topics discussed were more relevant to me; a research development person has the unenviable task of motivating and assisting faculty members in the development and submission of grant proposals solely by cajoling.

I particularly enjoyed the workshop on Large Proposals. It covered RFA requirements, elements of a good proposal, stages of proposal development, execution, and submission of the proposal with the enthusiastic participation of the attendees. The discussion on how to assemble a team of investigators and get that team to stick to a schedule and make progress was especially interesting and useful to me. I also have been using the practical tips I got from the other attendees to develop and submit multi-disciplinary proposals.

No matter how many NORDP Annual Conferences you have attended, you will always get useful information and tips from your colleagues!

Visit the NORDP Store online now through March 15! 

We hope to see you at the Conference, which will be held April 29 – May 1, 2019, at the Omni Providence Hotel in Providence, RI. For more information about the conference program or to register, visit http://www.nordp.org/conferences. Follow @NORDP_official on Twitter for all the latest #NORDP2019 updates.

NORDP fosters a culture of inclusive excellence by actively promoting and supporting diversity, inclusion and equity in all its forms to expand our worldview, enrich our work, and elevate our profession.

Welcome to NORDP’s Conference Career Center

conference-2019

Did you know that NORDP will host its first Conference Career Center during the 2019 Annual Research Development Conference? If you searching for the best Research Development professionals, we recommend you complete the 2019 Employer Career Center Application on or before April 8, 2019. This is your opportunity to:

  • Gain access to an exceptional, talented and skilled pool of research development professionals.
  • Get a head start on your recruitment/hiring efforts for new staff in 2019, i.e., spring, summer, or fall.
  • Conduct onsite interviews during the conference and meet with many qualified applicants.

Our conference planning team will provide you with access to potential applicants and assist you with scheduling onsite interviews. And there is no cost to list a position for NORDP members!

Job Seekers/Applicants – You can explore Career Center opportunities HERE. Watch for updates as we approach the conference. For more information or questions, please email administrator@nordp.org.

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We hope to see you at the Conference, which will be held April 29 – May 1, 2019, at the Omni Providence Hotel in Providence, RI. For more information about the conference program, visit http://www.nordp.org/conferences.

Follow @NORDP_official on Twitter for all the latest #NORDP2019 updates.

MSI Member Cameo: Xia (Anna) Wood

As an organization, NORDP fosters a culture of inclusive excellence by actively promoting and supporting diversity, inclusion, and equity in all its forms to expand our worldview, enrich our work, and elevate our profession for decades to come.   

To further enable a richly diverse and robust national peer network of research development professionals as well as organizational representation, we are highlighting members from minority serving institutions (MSIs) in a new blog series. 

Our first cameo introduces Xia (Anna) Wood.

Who: Xia (Anna) Wood, Assistant Director of Research Development & International Relations
Where: Johnson C. Smith University
Number of Years in RD: 13
Length of NORDP Membership: 2

What attracted you to NORDP?

I initially discovered NORDP at the recommendation of my supervisor, the Vice PresidentXia Wood Pic for Government Sponsored Programs and Research, who is  a NORDP member and suggested I look into attending the conference. I then joined the NORDP and learned of the conference travel award, which I applied for and received in 2017. I really like the focus of research enterprise development unique to NORDP that  is quite different from other research administration associations I have been involved with.

How does your NORDP membership enhance your own career?

My involvement with the mentoring program stands out for me. I enrolled the RD mentor program and had a mentor at my first conference who has been a great help to me both professionally and personally. My mentor provided a great deal of encouragement and guidance to me as I advanced my RD career.

I also enjoy using the online resources NORDP provides to members, such as the platform for groups with common interests to “hang out” together and archived webinars on professional development, which I can use to recharge myself at any time.

What have you enjoyed about past NORDP conferences you’ve attended?

I have really enjoyed the poster sessions at the past conference where I have been able to connect with colleagues at comparable institutions. These conversations have provided me with numerous strategies to address similar issues that we all face, e.g., how to reduce the number of last-minute submissions, how to motivate our faculty to write more grant proposals while having many other commitments on campus.

I have also enjoyed interactions with R01 universities and learning how they manage proposal development. Most importantly, I learned from them about how to build our research enterprise through both internal and external strategic collaborations. In addition, I appreciated the opportunities to interact with a variety of federal agencies and talk with Program Officers at my last NORDP conference.

Have you implemented something you’ve learned at the Conference in your RD career? What?

First and foremost, one of the outcomes of attending this conference is that our institution created a position for research development. Additionally, I have picked up a number of helpful resources from NORDP that I have been able to incorporate into my own campus workshops for faculty and professional staff. These ideas have really helped me in my efforts to help faculty improve their proposal quality and increase our university’s grant application submissions. I have also integrated some great strategies on challenges that we all face with things like last minute submissions and some marketing strategies into our practice.

Compiled by Daniel Campbell, Member Services Committee

NORDP Board Member Cameo: Jeri Hansen

Who: Jeri Hansen, Director of Research Development
Where: Utah State University
Number of years in Research Development: 10
Length of NORDP membership: 8 years

When and how did you enter the field? What kind of RD work do you do?

 I would say I started down the research development path when I was hired as a sponsored programs administrator at Utah State University in 2004. Hansen 2019.JPGFour years into that position, in 2008, I was asked by the VPR to explore establishing a proposal writing institute for faculty. That same year, the VPR decided to create an Office of Proposal Development. I applied for the manager position and was hired. As the years passed, the office’s portfolio of work grew to encompass much more than proposal development. So, the name was changed to Research Development and I became director. Nowadays, my focus is on implementing and improving resources for faculty – tools, trainings, internal funding, people – to help them increase their competitiveness in the external funding realm.

What’s your history with NORDP? How have you engaged with the organization (committee work, conferences attended/presented)? 

Shortly after I moved into the research development world, I was looking for a professional organization to help me get my legs underneath me. I found NORDP very early in its life – I joined in 2011 – one year after its official establishment. I have been a member of the Membership Committee (2012-14) and the Nominating Committee (2014-17), where I served as the Nominating Committee chair in 2016-17. I have also been a volunteer at the annual conference. In 2017, I decided to run for a seat on the Board of Directors, and was elected to serve in that capacity from 2017-2021. I now serve as the Board liaison to the Nominating Committee, and most recently was elected as Treasurer (2018-2020). I helped present a general session and pre-conference workshop during the 2018 annual conference, and have attended 6 of the 8 conferences since I joined the organization (I still have all my badges!).

What relationships have you built as a result of NORDP (new colleagues, connections to institutions where you previously had no point of contact)?

 I’m not sure where to even begin with this question! The number of colleagues I now have all over the country because of my involvement in NORDP is amazing. But that is the key – becoming involved. I’m not a terribly outgoing person (hello, introvert), so I must have been possessed when I decided to run for the Board. But as challenging as being a board member can be, it has also been the most rewarding in terms of the relationships and connections I have been able to build. My advice to any member is to push yourself out of your comfort zone. I know – you hear that all the time, but with NORDP, you really will find a reward if you do.

What inspired you to run for a position and serve on the NORDP board?

I’m not sure I would call it inspiration, but I was looking for a way to have more of an impact on the organization and its future. Plus, I looked at the makeup of the Board and really wanted to get to know those individuals better. I feel so involved (big deal for an introvert) and a part of the organization now, and that is a really neat experience.

What initiative are you most excited about in your role as a board member?

I have a soft spot for PEERD (Program for External Evaluation of Research Development). I was once a reviewer and now I’m co-coordinator with Kay Tindle at Texas Tech University. I think PEERD epitomizes NORDP as a whole – a very talented group of professionals more than willing to share knowledge and best practices for the betterment of everyone. You can’t beat that! If you haven’t checked out the PEERD program, you should – https://www.nordp.org/peerd.

What is your proudest accomplishment as NORDP board member?

I wouldn’t necessarily call it “my” accomplishment because I think as a board member, we build upon what others who have gone before us have done. That is especially true for those of us in officer roles. Having said that, as Treasurer, I recently worked with our administrative management company to move a lot of the day-to-day accounting and bookkeeping duties to them so I could be freed up to focus on more strategic thinking, such as looking at investing a portion of the organization’s revenue with the goal of being able to operate on investment dividends at some point in the future.

Compiled by Daniel Campbell, Member Services Committee

NORDP fosters a culture of inclusive excellence by actively promoting and supporting diversity, inclusion and equity in all its forms to expand our worldview, enrich our work, and elevate our profession.

NORDP Board Member Cameo: David Stone

Who: David Stone, Ph. D., Chief Research Officer
Where: Oakland University
Number of years in Research Development: 12
Length of NORDP membership: 8 years

When and how did you enter the field? What kind of RD work do you do?

In 2005, when I was working in Europe but planning to come to Northern Illinois University as director of sponsored projects, I did an environmental scan in Europe and the US to better understand the needs of faculty with respect to Stone photo 1.jpgexternal funding. On the basis of that scan, I saw that faculty at mid-tier institutions like NIU needed assistance with what I call positioning (strengthening their standing in the literature, as researchers, and as grant writers) in order to compete with their colleagues who were selected out of grad school by larger research universities. On that basis, I created a hybrid job that I called research development specialist, a single role that handled the standard pre-award requirements, but who also worked very closely with faculty to strengthen their positioning prior to (and then throughout) their efforts are seeking funding. I am now the chief research officer at Oakland University, where I have made research development integral to our office.

What’s your history with NORDP? How have you engaged with the organization (committee work, conferences attended/presented)?

I had been discussing my new model of RD with Holly before the gathering that led to the founding of NORDP. I presented at the first meeting and have, I think at all subsequent meetings, and was asked to serve on the board in 2012. I have been on the board ever since, including a stint as president in 2014-15. I have served on numerous committees in that time, and in 2015, I founded NORD with the goal of establishing research development not just as a profession, but also as a field of research, providing an opportunity for scholars both within and outside NORDP to create new knowledge based on the work we do in RD and the role it plays in higher education, in science, in economic development, in technology advancement, in knowledge mobilization, and elsewhere.

What relationships have you built as a result of NORDP (new colleagues, connections to institutions where you previously had no point of contact)?

In my years in NORDP, and especially through the board, I have made a number of very strong connections that I have come to rely on in my work. Having served as president, I find that I can call any university in the country when I have a question or need some feedback, and my requests are always welcomed.

What inspired you to run for a position and serve on the NORDP board?

Back in 2010, when we were first talking about whether research development was a coherent thing, something that could be recognized as a profession, it was less clear whether people working in models like mine at NIU would be understood to be doing research development. At that point in time, most people connected to the movement were working in very large universities on very large projects. So, when I was asked to be on the board, and again when I was asked to run for president, I made it clear that core to my mission would be to ensure that the kinds of RD that are carried out at smaller schools and that often involve research admin work as well as RD would be valued, recognized, and represented in NORDP. So during the bylaws revisions in 2013-14, I ensured that there would always be seats on the board for representatives from PUIs, mid-level schools, and minority serving institutions. I am very heartened by the fact that the vast majority of the growth in NORDP membership since 2012 has been in these kinds of institutions.

What initiative are you most excited about in your role as a board member?

I continue to be very excited about the prospects for NORD. Last year we partnered with InfoReady to offer small grant awards to investigators interested in conducting research on (or about) research development. InfoReady has committed $30,000 for three years of pilot funding for these awards in order to kick start RD as a field of study. Unlike research administration, which uses a static body of knowledge to support the work of its professionals, RD professionals always work strategically and contextually, and so need a living, breathing, always developing literature that they can draw from like professionals do in other strategic fields like management or healthcare. Helping launch RD as a field is a complex undertaking, but it plays to my strengths as an interdisciplinary philosopher of science, and so I very much enjoy it and am excited for the day when RD is studied by disciplines outside of us who are examining our contributions to larger issues in higher education, science policy, science funding, faculty development, networked industrial policy, and other issues that are shaping our future.

Compiled by Daniel Campbell, Member Services Committee

NORDP fosters a culture of inclusive excellence by actively promoting and supporting diversity, inclusion and equity in all its forms to expand our worldview, enrich our work, and elevate our profession.

 

HUDDLE: A New Year’s Resolution You’ll Love to Keep!

Dear NORDP Colleagues,

We ALWAYS hear that the best thing about attending a NORDP conference (even beyond all the great information and education) is the JOY of connecting with new colleagues and renewing the friendships we’ve made during our years in Research Development.

But why wait an entire year? Take this New Year’s Resolution with us: Let’s get together throughout the year by letting one another know when we are attending a business-related conference, so we can HUDDLE! Let’s not rely on serendipity or fickle fate!

It’s simple. When you decide you are attending a conference, send an email to the NORDP listserv and invite other members who may be attending for their organization to HUDDLE with you sometime at the conference. It adds another dimension to your conference and it’s just FUN to get together this way!

Our best wishes for a productive and wonderful 2019!

Warm regards, your Strategic Alliance Committee Co-Chairs

Rachel Dresbeck
Gretchen Kiser
Peggy Sundermeyer

NORDP fosters a culture of inclusive excellence by actively promoting and supporting diversity, inclusion and equity in all its forms to expand our worldview, enrich our work, and elevate our profession.