2016 Conference Cameo: Marley Bauce

More than 300 research development professionals will be gathering in Orlando this May for the 2016 NORDP Conference. Will you be joining us? Register at http://www.nordp.org/conferences, and enjoy this week’s featured Conference Cameo!


Who: Marley Bauce, Manager of Research Initiatives, Office of the Executive Vice President for Research
Where: Columbia UniversityMB Headshot
Number of years in research development: 7
Length of NORDP membership: 2 years
Number of NORDP conferences attended: 1

I run the Research Initiatives in Science & Engineering (RISE) program, the largest seed funding competition for Columbia faculty, which provides introductory support for interdisciplinary research collaborations that cannot receive conventional funding because they are too preliminary, too risky, or too non-conforming. In addition, I help administer limited submission competitions for the University, and maintain a number of communications capacities, including authoring articles on interdisciplinary scientific research for The Record, Columbia’s largest internal newspaper, and producing my office’s semiannual newsletter. Finally, I coordinate large events, including faculty networking receptions, information sessions, proposal writing workshops, and promotional campus visits by government agencies. The remaining pieces of my work revolve around opportunistically and creatively establishing new ways to competitively advance Columbia’s stature with the extramural research funding world – a task that I enjoy immensely.

I began my career as the Manager of the Blavatnik Awards for Young Scientists, a funding competition jointly run by the Blavatnik Family Foundation and the New York Academy of Sciences. I helped expand the awards program from a regional to a national competition in 2013, wherein I was chiefly responsible for the communications plan, recruitment of senior judges and the Science Advisory Council, and development of application and evaluation materials.

Early into my time at Columbia, Susan Gomes, Harvard University’s Director of Research Development & Strategy within the Faculty of Arts & Sciences, encouraged me to join NORDP, and I’m terribly glad I did. Last year’s NORDP conference allowed me to develop relationships with other RD staff and begin sharing ideas for best practices and identifying common challenges. It was useful to understand various university structures – their unique reporting lines, data management techniques, extra-institutional partnerships, and indirect cost agreements.  The NORDP conference was an exceptional way of recognizing that I am not an island, but rather part of a larger community of professionals deeply committed to increasing the diversity, momentum, and traction of interdisciplinary research for the public good.  Last year, I attended a presentation about merging foundation relations with research; it provided me with a new perspective on collaborating and establishing constant communications lines with our foundation relations staff, particularly while we engage the W.M. Keck Foundation.

Together with Susan Gomes, I co-lead the new Ivy Plus Research Development Group, containing 20 members across seven institutions. We met at last year’s conference and will meet again for a half day before this year’s conference. I encourage all conference attendees to take full advantage of the conference features – workshops, dinners, networking receptions, etc. This is a rare critical mass of people who can help and be helped by you, so don’t waste the opportunity!


We hope to see you at the 2016 NORDP Research Development Conference, which will be held May 23-25 in Orlando, FL. For more information about the conference program or to register, visit http://www.nordp.org/conferences. Follow @NORDP_official on Twitter for all the latest 2016 Conference updates.

If you’d like to be featured in a Conference Cameo, let us know at rdconf@nordp.org

 

2016 Conference Cameo: Mary Sym

Research development professionals from all regions of the U.S. – and abroad! – will be converging on Orlando in just 10 weeks for the 2016 NORDP Conference. Register at http://www.nordp.org/conferences, and enjoy this week’s featured Conference Cameo, which comes to us from Princeton University.


Who: Mary Sym, PhD, Assistant Director, Project Development
Where: Princeton University
Number of years in research development: 2.5
Length of NORDP membership: 2 years
Number of NORDP conferences attended: 2

More than 10 years ago, I began working in research administration, but we did not have Mary Sym_2016the phrase “research development” in our lexicon. Federal funding agencies were busy launching several large-scale initiatives geared toward interdisciplinary team science. Although many faculty were interested in participating, at the time, our university did not have dedicated staff or resources to support these kinds of projects. I was asked to bring teams of interested scientists together and help develop competitive applications for these funding initiatives.

After a few years working in big pharma, I circled back to academic research administration here at Princeton. My supervisor told me about NORDP and it sounded like the perfect venue for getting up to speed on the research development landscape, which has grown and matured tremendously in the past decade.

As a NORDP member, I have enjoyed talking with other research development professionals to learn how similar many of our struggles and, more importantly, our solutions can be across a wide range of universities. Sharing best practices has been incredibly insightful.

My advice to first-time conference attendees: Bring a colleague or two so you can split up your office’s coverage of the concurrent sessions. When I went solo in the past, I had a hard time deciding which session to attend since so many were relevant and interesting.

I’m glad the conference is in Florida this year. In New Jersey, we recently had a blizzard that dumped over two feet of snow on us. I am definitely looking forward to the warm, sunny climate!


We hope to see you at the 2016 NORDP Research Development Conference, which will be held May 23-25 in Orlando, FL. For more information about the conference program or to register, visit http://www.nordp.org/conferences. Follow @NORDP_official on Twitter for all the latest 2016 Conference updates.

If you’d like to be featured in a Conference Cameo, let us know at rdconf@nordp.org.

2016 Conference Cameo: Nathan Meier

Don’t miss your opportunity to learn from and network with the largest gathering of research development professionals anywhere – register for the 2016 NORDP Conference today at http://www.nordp.org/conferences. Nearly 300 RD professionals already are registered! A new Conference Cameo from one of them, Nathan Meier, is posted below.


Who: Nathan Meier, Director of Research Strategy, Office of Research and Economic Development
Where: University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Number of years in research development: 13
Length of NORDP membership: 5 years
Number of NORDP conferences attended: 3

I have been “doing” research development since 2003, when I joined the University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL) as a proposal writer specialist. Over time, my portfolio hNathan Meier head shotas grown to include a range of responsibilities that I enjoy but that I am careful to ensure supplement rather than supplant my core skill set, which has proposal writing at its center. This is important because I believe most research development efforts will be wasted if we cannot ensure faculty have the support necessary to develop high quality, well-written grant proposals.

On any given day, you may find me facilitating external review, managing internal seed grant programs, supporting selection processes for limited submission competitions, organizing workshops or retreats to help catalyze interdisciplinary connections or to help faculty network with external partners, linking faculty with UNL’s proposal development staff, assisting with a faculty award nomination, facilitating a faculty development initiative, or working on something entirely new. Like so many of you, what I love most about my job is the fact that no two days are ever alike!

I subscribed to the NORDP listserv several years ago and became a member in 2011. I attended the conference in Austin, attended and presented at NORDP in Portland, and helped with abstract review and marketing leading up to and presented at the meeting last year in Bethesda. What I enjoy most about the annual conferences is the sense of community that has evolved over time. Finally, it seems, there is a professional home for those of us who do this type of work.

This year, I am really interested to see how the focus on creativity and innovation coalesces during the May meeting. As you think about registering for the conference in Orlando, I encourage you to consider inviting a colleague to attend, too. Since there is such a wealth of information shared each year, I have found that one of the best ways to maximize the time spent at the annual meeting is to ensure at least one other individual with whom I work also participates so we can discuss new ideas and approaches once we are back in the office.


We hope to see you at the 2016 NORDP Research Development Conference, which will be held May 23-25 in Orlando, FL. For more information about the conference program or to register, visit http://www.nordp.org/conferences. Follow @NORDP_official on Twitter for all the latest 2016 Conference updates.

If you’d like to be featured in a Conference Cameo, let us know at rdconf@nordp.org.

 

2016 Conference Cameo: Martha Payne

This is your final week to register for the 2016 NORDP Conference in Orlando at the discounted Early Bird rate! Registration fees increase on Tuesday, March 1. Register TODAY at http://www.nordp.org/conferences.

This week’s Conference Cameo feature comes to us from a first-time Conference attendee who’s new to the field of research development. Whether you’re new to the field of RD or just new to NORDP, the Conference offers opportunities to network with a larger group of RD experts than you’ll find anywhere else. We hope to see you there!


 

Who: Martha E. Payne, Ph.D., R.D., M.P.H.PayneM2011-08resize
Where: Duke University School of Medicine
Number of years in research development: New to the field, 25 years in research
Length of NORDP membership: New Member
Number of NORDP conferences attended: 0

After working as a faculty researcher for 25 years in the areas of nutrition, neuroimaging and psychiatry, I joined our Office of Research Development on Jan. 1, 2016. I was ready for a broader scope in my career, so I actively sought out this opportunity. I am especially thrilled at the variety of work involved in research development, the problem-solving that is required, and the opportunity to help investigators to maximize their chances of success.

Duke’s Office of Research Development provides services to help ensure submission of high-quality grant applications, especially large complex grants. Services include advice and guidance, project management, template preparation, and editing and integration of the application.

As a faculty researcher, I experienced first-hand the benefits that are delivered daily by the professional research development staff at Duke. For example, I attended a number of grant-writing workshops and general writing classes, which helped me to clarify the “message” for my grants’ reviewers. I also participated in mentoring programs, which provided guidance through the development of several grant applications and helped me to see my research from an outsider’s viewpoint.

I believe my multidisciplinary experience will provide familiarity with many relevant disciplines and, more importantly, allow me to understand investigators’ needs as they develop an interdisciplinary research project or one that aims to incorporate multiple areas of research. Having worked at all levels of research, from that of a research technician to laboratory manager to associate professor, I can offer a unique viewpoint to guide development of a proposal from the perspective of multiple members of the research team. My institutional knowledge also gives me a familiarity with many of Duke’s leaders and scientists, institutional procedures, and research support offices that are critical to a successful grant submission.

This will be my first NORDP conference, which was highly recommended by my supervisor, Dr. Joanna Downer. I especially look forward to the professional networking and career development opportunities that the conference affords. I expect that my attendance at NORDP will help me make a positive impact on the success of researchers across the Duke University School of Medicine.


 

We hope to see you at the 2016 NORDP Research Development Conference, which will be held May 23-25 in Orlando, FL. For more information about the conference program or to register, visit http://www.nordp.org/conferences. Follow @NORDP_official on Twitter for all the latest 2016 Conference updates.

If you’d like to be featured in a Conference Cameo, let us know at rdconf@nordp.org.

 

2016 Conference Cameo: Conrad Monson

In the weeks preceding the NORDP Annual Conference in Orlando, we’ll feature “Conference Cameos” on the blog. Conference Cameos are first-person perspectives submitted by registered Conference attendees. You can look forward to seeing these fellow RD professionals at the Conference!

Only two weeks remain to register for the Conference at the lowest available price! Registration fees increase on Tuesday, March 1. Secure your Early Bird discount by registering for the Conference today at http://www.nordp.org/conferences.


 

Who: Conrad B. Monson, PhD
Where: Brigham Young University
Number of years in research development: More than 25 years
Length of NORDP membership: 4 yearsMonson, Conrad university photo
Number of NORDP conferences attended: 4

I started in RD by working for large aerospace companies Boeing and Northrop Grumman. I led research efforts in Physiology and Human Factors Engineering that were funded with internal seed money but then required outside funding to sustain them. I have found the research development process in private industry to be very similar to the process in academia, but with a greater emphasis on pre-proposal marketing, peer reviews and competition analysis. I have been involved in academic RD for the past 4 years. I help faculty find funding, I meet with potential funders, advocate for research projects to funders and help faculty write better proposals. I also help develop funding and proposal seminars and workshops for faculty.

I heard about NORDP when I started at BYU and was researching the professional organizations that could best help me get ideas on starting a research development office. NORDP seemed to be the organization best suited to academic research development. The four years I have been with NORDP has confirmed for me that NORDP is indeed the best professional organization for academic RD.

I have enjoyed the presentations, posters and roundtable discussions on topics that are timely to my RD efforts including networking, team science, metrics development, and activities for a small RD office. I also had a good experience participating in the NORDP mentoring program. After learning about speed networking at a previous NORDP conference, I implemented it at BYU. For the past 3 years, speed networking has been a campus-wide success that will continue into the future.

There are several new colleagues with whom I connect every year at the NORDP conference. One colleague and I started a collaborative project between our institutions. It didn’t result in a joint proposal, but in the future, we will look for other collaborative opportunities. The workshop topics are relevant to my efforts and those of my BYU colleagues at facilitating more team science projects. Even though specific topics have not yet been announced, I am looking forward to the conference presentations and anticipate they will be very informative.

My advice to first-time conference attendees is: Attend the workshops to get in depth information on RD topics and also talk with presenters after their presentations. I found the connections after talks to be particularly helpful in learning how to implement new ideas.


 

We hope to see you at the 2016 NORDP Research Development Conference, which will be held May 23-25 in Orlando, FL. For more information about the conference program or to register, visit http://www.nordp.org/conferences. Follow @NORDP_official on Twitter for all the latest 2016 Conference updates.

If you’d like to be featured in a Conference Cameo, let us know at rdconf@nordp.org.

2016 Conference Cameo: Donna Scott Tilley

In the weeks preceding the NORDP Annual Conference in Orlando, we’ll feature “Conference Cameos” on the blog. Conference Cameos are first-person perspectives submitted by registered Conference attendees. You can look forward to seeing these fellow RD professionals at the Conference!

Don’t forget – registration fees increase on March 1. Secure your Early Bird discount by registering for the Conference today.


Who: Donna Scott Tilley, PhD, Assistant Provost and ProfessorDonna Scott Tilley, Texas Woman's University
Where: Texas Woman’s University
Number of years in research development: 2 years
Length of NORDP membership: 2 years
Number of NORDP conferences attended: 1

I took the position as Interim Assistant Provost for my university with the intent of going back to my teaching role when the university hired a permanent person. After about 6 months as interim, I started to really love the RD work. I applied for the permanent position and was delighted to be appointed. I oversee our Research and Sponsored Programs office. I work with the team to make sure we are using our limited resources in the best way possible to maximize faculty success in research. I work with individual faculty to help them plan their program of research, facilitate collaborations between and among faculty, and advocate for research with administration. When I started this position, our Director of Operations suggested membership in NORDP right away – she said it would be a great source of support and information, and she was right!

After attending my first NORDP conference last year in Bethesda, I was convinced that this would be one of my most valuable professional development tools. I went to the Regional meeting at the conference and was immediately greeted by colleagues from other universities in my area. It was so great to hear what other universities were doing and make connections. I now reach out to these colleagues when I have a question or concern, to hear their perspectives. In addition, the conference sessions I attended were perfect for me – many provided foundational information, and others were thought-provoking and helpful for long term planning about improving what we do. For example, my university has purchased resources that we first learned about at the conference, and I’ve changed our internal competition procedures based on sessions I attended.

Because of my great experience at my first conference, I am bringing several office staff to Orlando for this year’s conference. I am looking forward to the networking and the sessions – there is so much to learn about this job!

My advice to first-time conference attendees is: Don’t sit with the same people at every session – mix it up and meet new people. Go to your regional group meeting and talk to people. Don’t skip sessions, even if you think they might not be directly applicable to your institution. Even if they don’t directly apply, there will be some little pearl of wisdom you can use. Have fun!


 

We hope to see you at the 2016 NORDP Research Development Conference, which will be held May 23-25 in Orlando, FL. For more information about the conference program or to register, visit http://www.nordp.org/conferences. Follow @NORDP_official on Twitter for all the latest 2016 Conference updates.

If you’d like to be featured in a Conference Cameo, let us know at rdconf@nordp.org.

 

NORDP 2015 Conference Cameo: Lucy Deckard

Who: Lucy Deckard, President
Where: Academic Research Funding Strategies, LLC
Number of years in research development: 14
Length of NORDP membership: 
5 
Number of NORDP conferences attended: 3
It was my good luck that NORDP was being established just I decided to leave my position in Research Development at Texas A&M University to start a consulting business. Independent consultants depend on networking and word of mouth to connect with potential clients. Our currency is information, and one of the most valuable things we can provide a client is a broader perspective that reaches beyond their particular institution. What approaches have other institutions employed to address specific research development challenges? What works and what doesn’t? What are the larger trends in research funding and research development?

NORDP has been instrumental in helping me address all of those aspects. Attending NORDP conferences has provided invaluable opportunities to connect with potential clients across the country and meet clients with whom I’d previously only talked on the phone. The information I’ve learned at the conference has helped me to build a much broader understanding of the research development landscape across the country than I could ever have done on my own. Interestingly, when I attended my first NORDP conference in 2010, I was the only consultant there. At last year’s conference, I met a number of other independent consultants. It was wonderful to be able to share advice with them and commiserate about challenges.

In past conferences, I’ve participated in NORDP conferences in various ways, including serving as part of the planning committee, presenting, and volunteering to be a scribe. For this year’s conference, I’m particularly looking forward to meeting old friends and making new ones. To get the most out of the conference, I recommend that you make a point to talk to people you don’t know. Sit only at tables where you don’t know the other people and ask them about their research development roles at their institutions.

We hope to see you at the 2015 NORDP Research Development Conference, April 29 to May 1 in Bethesda, MD. For more information about the conference program or to register, click here